Firkin


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Firkin

An obsolete unit of volume equivalent to one-quarter of one barrel.
References in periodicals archive ?
But The Flapper's Art Deco-ish inn sign dispels any doubt about Firkin's vision: a 1920s short-haired young woman, clearly wearing make-up and doubtless, could we but see them, a loose, armless, hip-waistlined, knee-length dress flapping around her provocatively rouged knees as she makes her jazz moves, ciggie in one hand, alcoholic drink in the other.
Contestants who ate the most wings received a $100 Firkin and Pheasant gift certificate.
A spokesman for owners Six Continents Retail, who decide to re-name the pub from New Year's Day, said, "Actually, most Swansea people never stopped calling the pub The Cricketers even when it was called The Fine Leg and Firkin."
It added that a commemorative celebration was being organised in honour of The Flapper - and its previous incarnations as The Flapper and Firkin and The Longboat - to include special events and bands playing possibly the last gigs at the venue.
On its Facebook page, The Flapper And Firkin states: "We understand word is spreading fast, but we don't actually know all the details yet.
Gwyn said: "We've got equipment from France installed by the guy who set up the Firkin Brewery which go back to the late seventies and early eighties.
Goldie Lookin Chain will hit Bristol's The Fleece and Firkin on December 11, Cardiff's Clwb Ifor Bach on December 16 and the Camden Underworld in London on December 18.
Sam Jones, 72, was on a day trip to Portsmouth when he stopped for a pint at the Fleet and Firkin. But a barman at the Portsmouth University haunt told the Londoner: "I want to save you the embarrassment of asking to be served as you'll be refused."
Beer barrels held a firkin (nine gallons) or a hogshead (52 1/2 gallons).
One reader reckons my team should change the name of their stadium from Fir Park to Firkin Park as it's no firkin use for football but there's always someone worse off than yourself.
I AM trying to find descendants of Charles Henry Blakeman, who was born 1879 in Dudley and later lived in Birmingham, and Amy Firkin, who was born 1884 in Birmingham.
RUGBY and pub memorabilia enthusiasts may be interested in a charity auction being held at the Flanker and Firkin pub in New Union Street, Coventry city centre.