Fire Drill

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Fire Drill

In investment banking, a slang term for the pressing need to finish a presentation or other project as soon as possible.
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'Although JBPM has conducted thousands of fire safety awareness talks and fire drills every year, more should be done in order to help equip the people with basic fire safety knowledge and skills,' he said in a statement here yesterday.
Additionally, there aren't any fire drills or training yet again.
Franklin Perkins school on Friday said while a fire drill held during subfreezing temperatures on Tuesday might have been postponed to a warmer day, with special education students it is a good idea to do more rather than less when it comes to fire and emergency drills.
The purpose of the fire drill was to provide tactical experience, sufficient knowledge and training for all hotel members as well as empower them to calmly face and handle all circumstances that might arise during emergencies, especially fire.
The study also found that more than half (53%) of those polled were unaware of the need to test fire safety equipment, while 48% had never taken part in a fire drill.
Civil defence personnel conducting a fire drill in Dubai.
Minister Kim Yong-chun repeated Pyongyang's charge on Thursdaythatthe South is preparing to start a war by conducting the live fire drills close to the border of the North.
All went according to plan and we will be working with West Midlands Fire Service to do further fire drills in the future when the tower cranes reach their full height of 101m.
The union claimed 27 per cent of schools had no fire drills last year, 19 per cent have no safety statement although it's a legal requirement and only half have a safety representative.
The schedule may include exercises from replenishment to man overboard exercises, to full ship fire drills and flight operations.
Members take part in a wide range of events and activities including learning how to use a fire hose and breathing apparatus, carrying out fire drills, taking part in national competitions and learning first aid.
Other missteps identified by recruiters were committing cultural gaffes and/or political suicide (16 percent), waiting too long to implement change (16 percent), not spending enough face time with subordinates (14 percent), getting sidetracked by "fire drills" (11 percent) and hesitating on tough personnel decisions (10 percent).