Fibonacci Numbers

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Related to Fibonacci series: Golden ratio

Fibonacci Numbers

A sequence of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two previous numbers (1, 1, 2 and so on). Some technical analysts use Fibonacci numbers to determine which securities are bullish or bearish. Some of the ways they use Fibonacci numbers are Fibonacci time zones, Fibonacci retracement, Fibonacci fans, and Fibonacci arcs.
References in periodicals archive ?
When designing radiuses, you can create an S curve by using the Fibonacci series. The larger curve should not exceed the 1:2 ratio at the beginning of the Fibonacci scale, says landscape architect Michelle Van de Voorde, president of Van de Voorde Landscape Architecture Inc.
A confirmation of coincidence or near-coincidence of the pattern would signal a strong validation of the predictive power of Fibonacci series.
She builds proportions according to the numbers of the Fibonacci series and/or other additive-automorphological mathematical series (for their definition see footnote 28 below).
The Fibonacci series was discovered in the thirteenth century by the mathematician monk Leonardo of Pisa, who published it in a book important for a number of things, including the popularization of the now-familiar Hindu-Arabic numerals.
The Fibonacci series is a sequence of numbers created by Leonardo Fibonacci in 1202.
Beyond expressing this simple ratio, phi is intimately associated with the Fibonacci Series. The Fibonacci Series was made famous by the thirteenth century Italian mathematician Leonardo of Pisa.
The 84-letter sets had the same fine structure as the Fibonacci series itself, a strict alternation of one even and two odd numbers.
The author introduces a geometric explanation of Phi Ratio, the Fibonacci Series and the Pentagon.
Concepts based on a symmetrical structure were abandoned for a pattern of spirals, based on the Fibonacci series and phyllotaxis (the mathematical basis for most plant growth), which will re-appear-in the sculpture that will sit almost hidden in the core of the Core.
He was filmed by Gerry Schum (the pioneering filmmaker who collaborated with artists including Dennis Oppenheim, Joseph Beuys, and Robert Smithson in establishing an ephemeral "television gallery" of commissioned video works) drawing, on a sheet of glass, a spiral starting from the center--where he had placed a snail--to which he later added the numbers of the Fibonacci series: 1; 1; 2; 3; 5; 8; 13; and so on.
I'm also slightly bemused by familiar sequences, such as pi and the Fibonacci series:
By this time Tworkov had sublimated de Kooning's slash and splash into what he called a "brushing [ldots] analogous to the beat in music." He was also learning from his students at Yale, where he taught from 1963 to 1969: He credited Jennifer Bartlett with introducing him to the Fibonacci series, which inspired his '70s geometrical explorations (not on view).