Fibonacci Numbers


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Related to Fibonacci Numbers: Golden ratio

Fibonacci Numbers

A sequence of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two previous numbers (1, 1, 2 and so on). Some technical analysts use Fibonacci numbers to determine which securities are bullish or bearish. Some of the ways they use Fibonacci numbers are Fibonacci time zones, Fibonacci retracement, Fibonacci fans, and Fibonacci arcs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shiokawa, Algebraic relations for reciprocal sums of Fibonacci numbers, Acta Arith.
For the students, it could be noted that the coefficients of a and b in the sequence [t.sub.n] are successive Fibonacci numbers and they seem never to have common factors.
Eventually, we used the Fibonacci numbers to establish that the ratio of cases with isolated people to the total number of possibilities approaches one as the number of people increases.
A number sequence named after him known as the Fibonacci numbers, which he did not discover but used as an example in the Liber Abaci.
Two sequences are of great importance: the Fibonacci numbers F = [f.sub.n] = ..., 2, -1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 2, ...
Any college-level collection strong in science and nature--and many a public lending library--will find this a fascinating review of the history of the Fibonacci numbers and their applications to everything from nature to art and the stock market.
In this issue of Pool & Spa News, we unravel a code known by many names: Phi, the Fibonacci numbers and the golden spiral.
A function which returns a stream of the Fibonacci numbers in linear time: fibs@(_:rest) = 0 : 1 : (zipWith (+) fibs rest)
To get started, I switched to math input and entered a recursive expression to evaluate Fibonacci numbers, a subject I had come across while researching mathematical topics.
These are called Fibonacci numbers and are generated by adding the previous two numbers in the list together to form the next and so on.
Professionals are actually paid for the fun of trading using visual cues like moving average oscillators, Fibonacci numbers, and Japanese candlestick patterns.
The numbers of spirals are most often two consecutive Fibonacci numbers. The flower of an English daisy, pictured in the exhibition, consists of 21 spirals clockwise and 34 counterclockwise.