Federalism

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Federalism

A political system in which the central government has certain, enumerated powers, and other government responsibilities are delegated to lower levels of government. For example, a federalist system may designate the central government to handle monetary policy and foreign affairs, but delegate most other matters to the provinces or states. Examples of federalist countries include the United States and Canada.
References in periodicals archive ?
exclusive" or "plenary" federal power over Indians.
The most important is her neglect of substantive divisions between state and federal power.
expanding federal power to preempt states, and state and local
International law thus informed the Founders' original understanding of the Ninth Amendment as limiting federal power to intrude upon powers and rights left to sovereign control of the people in the states.
State infringements on individual rights, he argued, posed a far smaller danger to liberty than expanded federal power.
The local government-sponsored candidate was attempting to remove a legal ban on his remaining in power indefinitely, which would have made it easier for President Nestor Kirchner to retain his federal power indefinitely.
The framers also knew that the Constitution's limitations on federal power were mere words on paper without institutional reinforcement.
Lieberman even voted with Bush to strip Terri Schiavo's husband of his rights--a failed attempt to use federal power to interfere with a partner's most private and painful decisions.
Is there any real accountability for lethal abuses of federal power, such as the needless killing of U.
For students, Emanuel (Harvard Law School) presents a study guide on constitutional law that reviews specific cases and concepts dealing with the Supreme Court, federalism and federal power, federal commerce and other national powers, the commerce clause and congressional action, intergovernmental immunities and interstate relations, separation of powers, due process, equal protection, miscellaneous clauses, state action, congressional enforcement of civil rights, freedom of expression and religion, and justiciability.
If they do, it might explain the unflagging interest of President Bush - and his three predecessors - in raiding the federal power marketing agency to help underwrite the federal budget.
5) Along the way, Story seemingly dismantled prior states' rights interpretations of federal power, particularly St.

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