Federal Poverty Level


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Federal Poverty Level

The minimum yearly income that a person or family needs in order to provide for its basic needs. The Department of Health and Human Services calculates the Federal Povery Level and publishes it each February. The actual dollar amount varies according to family size. Different agencies of the U.S. Government use the FPL in determining eligibility for certain programs, notably TANF and Medicaid.
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* Percentage of population living below the federal poverty level.
More importantly, children are eligible for the OHP if their families' income is under 300 percent of the federal poverty level, or about $70,000 for a family of four.
That program applies to drivers whose household income is at or below 125 percent of the federal poverty level, and reduces surcharges to 10 percent of the total charged or a maximum of $250.
PPACA includes other provisions scheduled to go into effect in 2014 aimed at closing the uninsured gap, including expanding Medicaid eligibility to all individuals with income up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, not just adults with children.
The ACA will expand the population of eligible participants to include a considerable proportion of very low income, nonworking adults with chronic and complex health needs, including single, childless adults living at 133% of the federal poverty level. Individuals below 50% of the federal poverty level will have the highest levels of morbidity and comorbidity, including high rates of substance abuse.
In 2014, eligibility is expanded to all adults--parents or not--up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, which means 16 million people.
Enacted in March, the Affordable Care Act requires states to expand Medicaid by 2014 to include all legal residents earning less than 133 percent of the federal poverty level, or $14,400 for an individual.
MediKids and Healthy Kids offer a full-pay option for children with family incomes above 200 percent of the federal poverty level. No state or federal funds are used for the full-pay population.
In both time spans, children from families below the federal poverty level were more likely to have hearing loss than children from more financially secure households.
Instead of determining eligibility by group (say, children or pregnant women), everyone below 133% of the federal poverty level will be eligible for the benefit.
About 72% of teens who had either fathered a child or given birth as a teenager were living in households that were above the federal poverty level. "Despite what many may believe, teen childbearing is not limited to a particular income group or family structure, which means that prevention efforts must be broad in their design and reach," Sarah Brown, CEO of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unintended Pregnancy, said in a statement.
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