Extortion

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Extortion

An illegal act in which one coerces another into providing money or something else of value. For example, one may extort money from a business by threat of force. Extortion historically has been common in organized crime.
References in periodicals archive ?
(74) Thus, the catchall five-year statute for non-capital federal offenses governs criminal RICO cases.
The report also analyzed federal sentences by race, finding that Hispanics convicted of any federal offense were more likely than non-Hispanics to be sentenced to prison.
(119) Recognizing that other provisions in section 924 demonstrate Congress's ability to incorporate state law offenses alongside federal offenses when it intends to do so, the Court concluded that the "any felony" phrase does not sweep in all state felony offenses concurrently "punishable" under federal law.
* a federal offense relating to peonage, slavery, involuntary servitude, or trafficking in persons;
If the officers were not guilty of the state offenses, they could not be guilty of the federal offenses either.
A bill that would make crimes motivated by gender, sexual orientation, or disability federal offenses stalled on June 11 when the Senate refused to limit debate on the proposal.
(83) Action is more politically popular than inaction, and at the federal level most anticrime legislation creates new federal offenses or provides new federal resources to prosecute federal offenses.
The LAPD's tabulated arrest data listed the number of arrests for individual charges, but also placed each charge in one of five degree categories: felonies (such as auto theft, burglary, assault, etc.), misdemeanors (such as petty theft, battery), non-criminal offenses (such as dependency, sexual delinquency), violations of municipal ordinances, and federal offenses. The final three categories account for the differences between the total distribution of arrests and the sum of felony and misdemeanor arrests.
For example, will the Republican majority in Congress be able to impose the death penalty for new federal offenses when all House Republicans but four have already endorsed the Sixth Commandment, "Thou Shalt Not Kill"?
Congress has increased exponentially the number of offenses constituting a crime, making federal offenses of many violations of the myriad sections in the Code of Federal Regulations (the repository of decades of rule-making by independent and other federal agencies).
Among other things, it seriously limits the ability of prisoners on death row to appeal their cases, and creates several new categories of federal offenses punishable by death.

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