Fed


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Federal Reserve System

The central bank system of the United States. The Federal Reserve regulates the monetary policy of the United States, especially by setting the discount rate and the fed funds rate and by buying and selling U.S. Treasury securities. It consists of 12 regional banks that operate under the guidance of a Federal Reserve Board, whose seven members are appointed by the President of the United States. The Federal Reserve System has the authority to print money, a controversial measure both now and at the time it was founded. All federally-chartered banks must belong to the Federal Reserve System and purchase a certain amount of stock in the Federal Reserve bank in charge of their particular regions. The Federal Reserve System was established in 1913.

Fed

References in periodicals archive ?
Obviously calves in this group were fed more and, therefore, higher gain in body weight was reported.
All neonates in group 1 were syringe fed and observed for 12-24 hours.
Mortality: Significantly (Pless than 0.05) higher mortality was observed in one hour fed followed by 2 and then 3- hour and ad-libitum fed quails (Table 3).
The birds kept under feed restriction methods showed a significant reduction in water consumption at the same ambient temperature as compared to continuous fed birds.
The Committee judges that some inflation risks remain," the Fed's statement read.
In August, Senior Editor Brian Doherty asked several Fed watchers to assess the Greenspan era, to speculate about the Bernanke era, to address the question of how important the Federal Reserve really is to the U.S.
In his memoir, A Term at the Fed, Meyer states that the Fed should have acted more aggressively to pop the bubble either in March 1997 or once the global financial turmoils ended.
The third and most vexing issue facing central banks today is the proper evaluation of asset prices, which have bedeviled monetary policymakers since the start of the Fed. Asset prices can go up for many reasons, especially in a high-productivity, low-interest-rate world, making it quite difficult to deconstruct why their prices changed.
This was summarized quite tidily in the headline of a May 19, 2003 Wall Street Journal report: "Having Defeated Inflation, Fed Girds for New Foe: Falling Prices."
The Fed's target interest rate on federal funds is followed closely, and expected changes in the future rate can affect the behavior of individuals and institutions.
That's how you may feel about the financial world after reading Martin Mayer's The Fed. Mayer's latest of 18 books recounts the Fed's role in the panics of recent years, depicting the Fed's power as more theatrical than actual.
(The supplements can be fed to pigs and poultry, because they don't get BSE-like diseases from food.)