substitute

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Substitute

A good or service that satisfies a consumer's needs or desires just as well or almost as well as a similar good or service. A common type of substitute is an off-brand product; for example, a grocery store may sell its own peanut butter to compete with the on-brand peanut butter it also sells. Often, though not always, the price of a substitute is lower than that of the original product, but they follow generally the same trends. For example, if demand for the on-brand peanut butter rises, its price increases, but so does the price of the off-brand peanut butter, because consumers are willing to pay more for peanut butter generally, but are still looking for a bargain.

substitute

See swap.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eating food which is naturally low in fat and calories may be a better route than relying on fat substitutes or artificial sweeteners.
introduced Avicel, a fat substitute consisting of a cellulose gel, in the mid 1960s, and National Starch and Chemical came out with a tapioca dextrin a decade later.
It appears to be pretty much the same story with fat substitutes.
The study by researchers at Purdue University showed that synthetic fat substitutes used in low-calorie potato chips and other foods could backfire and contribute to weight gain and obesity.
commissioned both studies to meet FDA requirements for post-marketing surveillance of the fat substitute, also known by the brand name Olean.
And they're adding indigestible gums and cellulose derivatives to foods as emulsifiers and fat substitutes.
Also called TrimChoice, Oatrim is proving to be not only a good fat substitute in dariy products but also in baked goods, unlike some of the earlier compounds that did not do well when heated.
Just as NutraSweet helped to popularize many types of light foods calling for sweetness without sugar, marketers are banking on the idea that a healthy fat substitute will do the same thing for products like ice cream, mayonnaise, cheese, and even butter.
In an attempt to match the texture of ice cream, the new frozen desserts use an array of ingredients, from Simplesse (a fat substitute made from proteins of egg whites and milk) and maltodextrin (a starch-based product) to polydextrose (a derivative of cornstarch) and a variety of natural gums (such as guar and cellulose).
Be aware some contain olestra (Olean), a calorie-free fat substitute that in large amounts can cause loose stools.