Fair Labor Standards Act

(redirected from Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938)
Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia.

Fair Labor Standards Act

Also called the FLSA. Legislation in the United States, passed in 1938, that required employers engaged in interstate commerce to provide a minimum level of employee benefits. For example, the FLSA prohibits child labor and established the first federal minimum wage. For purposes of this Act, "interstate commerce" is interpreted so broadly as to include basically all employers not specifically exempted. It was part of the New Deal.
References in periodicals archive ?
What follows is a basic summary of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, Workmen's Compensation, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and a general overview of zoning issues and labor law.
The amendment to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 states child labor is not oppressive to an individual who works in or outside a business where machinery is used to process wood, it that person:
These include Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the equal pay requirement under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, and the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993.
It's time to raise the minimum wage for working families, Historically, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 established a federal minimum wage and overtime requirements for covered American workers.
Historical events show that oppositions within the labor movement had prolonged passage of legislation relating to minimum wages and maximum hours, contained in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938
The wages, standard hours, and over time premia of workers in the United States are regulated by the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and amendments to that Act.
Under rules spawned by the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, it's illegal for children under 14 to work in any commercial establishment.
The Ballenger and Ashcroft bills would gut the part of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 that requires companies to pay employees who work more than forty hours a week one-and-a-half times their hourly salary.
Many companies want Congress to change overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 that require employers to pay time and a half for any work beyond 40 hours a week, with one proposal seeking a monthly ceiling instead.
The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 was a Depression-era enactment to combat unemployment and to help safeguard the standard of living for low-wage workers.
This special valuation rule applies only to "nonexempt" employees that are subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (as amended), 29 U.
Federal examples: the federal Occupational Health and Safety Act requires that employers provide employees a reasonably safe work environment; Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, mandates that employers not discriminate because of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; the Age Discrimination in Employment Act prohibits employer discrimination based on age; the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended, covers minimum wages, overtime pay, equal pay for equal work, and child labor standards.