Fair Labor Standards Act


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Fair Labor Standards Act

Also called the FLSA. Legislation in the United States, passed in 1938, that required employers engaged in interstate commerce to provide a minimum level of employee benefits. For example, the FLSA prohibits child labor and established the first federal minimum wage. For purposes of this Act, "interstate commerce" is interpreted so broadly as to include basically all employers not specifically exempted. It was part of the New Deal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seventy-five years ago, the Fair Labor Standards Act was enacted to safeguard the rights of America's workers--especially children.
Of course the New Deal's Wagner Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act are the most important concrete and symbolic moments for this aspect of the story.
Also, more wage and hour claims are arising under provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, he said.
The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires overtime pay at time and one-half the regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 hours in a workweek.
Q: Should associations be concerned about the application of the Fair Labor Standards Act to part-time nonexempt employees?
According to a Labor Department report, between 30,000 and 50,000 workers, primarily African Americans in the South, lost their jobs within just two weeks of the activation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (1938), which set a uniform minimum wage.
It will include information on breaking news on rulings that interpret workplace regulations such as ADA, Fair Labor Standards Act, Family & Medical Leave Act, HIPAA, and the Occupational Safety and Health Act.
Department of Labor recently issued final regulations to federal overtime pay requirements under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The "FairPay Overtime Initiative," which becomes effective on Aug.
(Riverwoods, IL) has released a special report covering the proposed revisions of the basic rules on who does and who doesn't qualify for overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).
Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, however, which governs minimum wage/maximum hour issues, an even broader interpretation of the term "employee" is used.
These rulings effectively create a big loophole in the Fair Labor Standards Act. Profits from sidestepping overtime or workers' comp are far in excess of the $10,000-per-worker fine Wal-Mart's cleaning contractors will likely pay.
The authors raise the need for better enforcement of existing health and safety regulations, especially those related to the appropriate use of personal protective equipment, and suggest revision of the Fair Labor Standards Act to include disinfectants as a hazard against which young workers must be protected.
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