Fair Credit Billing Act


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Fair Credit Billing Act

Also called the FCBA. Legislation in the United States, passed in 1974, that allowed credit card customers to dispute (in writing sent by mail) a charge made on their cards. For example, if an unauthorized person makes a charge on a card or if the credit card company bills an incorrect amount, the FCBA allows the customer to ask the charge to be removed or changed. The card holder is usually not liable for erroneous or fraudulent charges. The FCBA was an amendment to the Truth in Lending Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
" [Jonathan] Mullane commenced the small claims action against Barclays Bank Delaware (Barclays), alleging that Barclays violated the Federal Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA), 15 U.S.C.
Her practice includes complex creditor rights enforcement as well as defending lenders and other financial service industry clients in individual and class action claims for violations of federal consumer financial protection legislation such as the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA), Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA), Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), Truth In Lending Act (TILA), FTC Act, and Florida state consumer protection laws.
Customers who paid Direct Air by credit card may be entitled to a credit from their credit card company under the Fair Credit Billing Act. Write to your credit card issuer, being sure to state your account number.
Legislation such as Dodd-Frank, the CARD Act, and the Fair Credit Billing Act have been helpful to consumers with credit cards, but the rules undergirding fraud protection remain inadequate for bank cards: The protections for debit cards under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act are much weaker than those for credit cards.
Los usuarios siempre estaran protegidos del fraude si usan una tarjeta de credito, pues los ampara la Ley de Facturacion Justa de Credito (Fair Credit Billing Act), y los cargos se pueden disputar, ademas de retener los pagos mientras se efectua la investigacion pertinente.
Your liability for charges on a lost or stolen credit card is governed by the Fair Credit Billing Act. Debit cards are covered by the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, a different law with substantially different protections.
Under the Federal Fair Credit Billing Act, the law is on the side of the credit-card users, debit card users are on their own.
The Federal Fair Credit Billing Act gives you the right to dispute credit card charges for goods or services that were not ordered, never received, or misrepresented.
Refunds may also be obtained from the consumer's credit card company under the Fair Credit Billing Act.
Technically, according to the Fair Credit Billing Act (www.ftc.gov), you should write the letter within 60 days after receiving the first bill containing the error.
When credit cards are involved, the Fair Credit Billing Act limits the victim's liability for fraud to no more than $50, and the card issuer often waives that fee.
Under the Fair Credit Billing Act, if a credit card is immediately reported lost or stolen, the consumer is not responsible for unauthorized purchases.