Factor model

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Factor model

A way of decomposing the forces that influence a security's rate of return into common and firm-specific influences.

Factor Model

A mathematical calculation of the extent to which macroeconomic factors affect the securities in a portfolio. Factor models attempt to account for contingencies like changes in interest rates or inflation. Factor models fall into three main categories. A statistical factor model attempts to explain risks particular to an investment. A fundamental factor model looks at risks to an industry or market that may affect a portfolio. Finally, a macroeconomic factor model considers relevant risks to the wider economy. See also: Risk analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the statistical factor models passes neither the time-series or the cross-section tests in this analysis.
The current findings show no support for preferring either the one or three factor models over the other; both models appear to fit the data equally well.
The factor models which are measurement models explaining the relationship between the three latent constructs namely "Socio-environment cost", "Socio-cultural cost" and "Socio-economic cost" and their respective indicator variables are finally arrived at with necessary revisions.
Due to advancements in data collection techniques, factor models have become increasingly popular.
"Determining the Number of Factors in Approximate Factor Models." Econometrica, 70, 2002, 191-221.
Testing linear factor models on individual stocks using the average F-test.
If needed they can even be included in multiple factor models and assigned to constant values including zero as appropriate in the product.
At the same time, their focus was less on off-the-shelf factor capabilities and more on strategic factor models and a more holistic multi-factor approach that explains all of their factor exposures.
Detailed analysis of dynamics of the standard four factors from the Carhart model helped us to define the final specification of the five factor model. Below we present the detailed description of the procedure of calculating HML, SMB, VML and VMC risk factors, definitions of zero-investment portfolios based on them and then our observation concerning these factors' dynamics.
Lastly, the differences between the chi-square-values for the three models were calculated following a likelihood ratio test under the null hypothesis that the one-factor model fits as well as the two-factor models, and that the two-correlated factor model fits as well as the hierarchical factor model.
This debate is very relevant to the use of factor models. These models, which are used to design investment portfolios with specific characteristics, have been one of the most successful methods to come out of academic finance in the past 40 years.
(2011) and Machado & Medeiros (2011), among others, have demonstrated that this model is more suitable to explain the return on assets than the CAPM and other factor models as well.