Financial Times All-Share Index

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Financial Times All-Share Index

An index tracking approximately 600 publicly-traded companies listed on the London Stock Exchange and representing approximately 98% of the LSE's market capitalization. Like many other FTSE indices, it is calculated in real time, with prices updated every 15 seconds. Each quarter, the FTSE reevaluates the companies tracked on the index and makes necessary adjustments to ensure that it represents the correct companies. It includes all companies tracked by the FTSE 100, the FTSE 250, and the FTSE Small Cap. It is weighted for market capitalization.

Financial Times All-Share Index

see SHARE PRICE INDEX.

Financial Times All-Share Index

see SHARE PRICE INDEX.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has resulted in 22% - more than one in five - of the 640 FTSE All-Share companies being listed on the register, including Sky Group, Sports Direct and WPP.
By comparison, the FTSE AIM All-share index increased by 14% and the FTSE All-share index by just 3%.
It seeks to achieve a long term shareholders' total return in excess of the FTSE All-Share Total Return Index and maintain a progressive annual yield.
This is plain to see when we consider that the FTSE All-Share index is only 14% higher now than it was at the beginning of the century.
The FTSE All-Share Index total return is just over 1.
In the UK, the top 10 stocks made up 36 per cent of the FTSE All-Share Index at the end of 2013 with Vodafone weighing in at 5.
e FTSE 100 is at an identical level to which it started the year and the wider FTSE 250 and FTSE All-Share indices do not read any better.
But Ditchfield notes the FTSE All-Share is up by 14.
Moreover, the TSR of these companies recovered more quickly in 2009 compared with that of their FTSE 350 and FTSE All-Share peers," said Leena Al Olaimy, co-founder and managing director of 3BL.
F&C's Stakeholder Child Trust Fund tracks the performance of the FTSE All-Share index of UK shares - a broad index that includes medium-sized and smaller companies as well as the big hitters of the FTSE 100 index.
HSBC, at six per cent, is the largest company in the FTSE All-Share index so it is no surprise that the majority of S&P Capital IQ rated funds held a position in the their portfolio.