Fair Labor Standards Act

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Fair Labor Standards Act

Also called the FLSA. Legislation in the United States, passed in 1938, that required employers engaged in interstate commerce to provide a minimum level of employee benefits. For example, the FLSA prohibits child labor and established the first federal minimum wage. For purposes of this Act, "interstate commerce" is interpreted so broadly as to include basically all employers not specifically exempted. It was part of the New Deal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The absence of private injunctive relief is not the only remedial inadequacy that has prevented FLSA from effectively combatting wage theft on a systematic level; the statute also lacks an opt-out class mechanism.
The district court used a two-prong approach to determine the FLSA
detained immigrant workers are "employees" under the FLSA and,
However, when an employee has lost or intentionally damaged PPE, the employer is not required to pay for its replacement (although, FLSA rules pertaining to deductions still apply and state laws may also have restrictions).
In Cheeks, an employee-plaintiff brought claims for overtime wages against his employer under the FLSA and New York Labor Law.
Under the final rule, the FLSA salary threshold will be adjusted every three years and set at a rate that represents the 40th percentile of full-time salaried workers in the lowest-wage US Census region (currently the South).
Republican opponents of PPACA have tried to reduce the scope of the PPACA employer coverage mandate by proposing bills that could affect the kinds of matters normally governed by FLSA, such as whether an employee is a full-time worker or a part-time worker.
To make matters worse, FLSA violations usually aren't limited to one employee and can easily be converted to a collective action lawsuit (the FLSA's version of a class action).
It also said they "were and still are exempt from the minimum wage and overtime requirements of the FLSA."
"Other courts have echoed the First Circuit in its observation that the FLSA is the exclusive remedy of rights created under the FLSA.
Defendants challenge the applicability of the FLSA on two grounds.
We agree with other federal circuits, however, that under the FLSA the relevant unit for determining a pay violation is not wages per hour, but the average hourly wage across a workweek.