Expunge

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Expunge

Used in the context of general equities. Remove any trace of an Auto indication's existence at any time. See: Cancel.

Expunge

On AUTEX, to cancel an order such that it leaves no record either on the electronic board or in the historical archives of the board. A straight cancellation leaves a record in the archives of AUTEX, which may not be desirable for some traders who do not wish other traders to know that they were once interested in a certain transaction. Expunging the order removes this risk. See also: Cancel.
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In a small box in the middle of the page, the form said that that California would not even consider expungement applications submitted by individuals who had been convicted under a certain suite of statutes, including Kaushik's violent conviction from the 1990s.
LIFE: THE MYTH OF JUVENILE RECORD CONFIDENTIALITY AND EXPUNGEMENT IN
Indiana does not allow for expungement of the records of individuals who have been convicted of official misconduct, kidnapping, human trafficking, homicide, or sex crimes.
451) Amy Myrick has offered a sociological account of the depersonalization that individuals often experience when inquiring about expungement or sealing of criminal records.
Procedure prohibits expungement of domestic abuse battery convictions
In re Expungement for Spencer stated that North Carolina's
It was a burden that I didn't want to carry any more," Parchman said, after sharing his story with more than 150 area residents at an expungement informational clinic at Ivy Tech Community College.
In a study released last year, the Public Investors Arbitration Bar Association (PIABA) found that an "alarmingly high" percentage of brokers--90 percent--had their arbitration records wiped clean by hinging settlement on expungement.
Uggen's post on ex-felon employment and expungement blogger, ex-con Pete C.
1, 2007, through mid-May 2009, the PIABA study found expungement was granted in 89% of the cases resolved by stipulated awards or settlement.
Laws that allow expungement (the sealing or erasure of some minor offense, treating the event as if it never occurred) or legal pardons have been intended to give people, with cause, a second chance in which their past is removed from public record.
Some other jurisdictions place the burden of requesting expungement on the individual.