exposure

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Risk

The uncertainty associated with any investment. That is, risk is the possibility that the actual return on an investment will be different from its expected return. A vitally important concept in finance is the idea that an investment that carries a higher risk has the potential of a higher return. For example, a zero-risk investment, such as a U.S. Treasury security, has a low rate of return, while a stock in a start-up has the potential to make an investor very wealthy, but also the potential to lose one's entire investment. Certain types of risk are easier to quantify than others. To the extent that risk is quantifiable, it is generally calculated as the standard deviation on an investment's average return.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

exposure

see EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

exposure

(1) In finance,the amount that one may lose in an investment;the potential loss,which could be the capital invested plus any personal liability on loans in excess of the value of the property securing the loans. (2) In the market, the process of making a property known to the marketplace as available for sale or lease.(3) Physically, the direction of an improvement;for example,“The southern exposure of the house had all the best views.”

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly all companies were concerned with forecasted exposures; however, only a few were comfortable that they could accurately forecast those.
The first challenge involves programmatic scope--the need to focus the research portfolio on those diseases and exposures that will optimize the future utility of the research for the greatest impact on human health.
Where the species of macaque is noted, cases of human B-virus infection have all been associated with direct or indirect exposure specifically to rhesus macaques (14-19).
People who sustained high exposures over the years were 1.6 times as likely to die of cancer as coworkers with low exposures, the new study finds.
This can be achieved through what we call "stress tests," in which a bank conducts "what if" analyses of how credit exposures to a single counterparty could grow under extreme market conditions.
A unique feature of the standard is an exposure goal program, which encourages employers to reduce exposures to below the action level.
and foreign multinational corporations are taking a proactive stance in managing their foreign exchange exposure. Such exposure includes not only that of a transactional nature, such as when accounts payable for inventory purchases are in a foreign currency, or of a translational nature, such as when foreign assets change in value due to foreign exchange fluctuations, but also those of a structural (or economic) nature.
He had no pets or mold at home, no recent travel, and no environmental tobacco smoke exposures. He reported no other medical conditions.
Thirteen persons were considered to have had a variety of inhalation exposures. Four persons mentioned tasting, smelling, breathing, or having the spray blown in their face for 3-5 hours; another four participants referred to their involvement in spraying.
Either way, today's risks require some changes to today's products and some changes in the way we evaluate exposures.
Weaknesses in several key elements of the risk-management processes at some creditors and counterparties were magnified by competitive pressures, resulting in risk exposures that may not have been fully understood or adequately managed.
Do foreign currency exposures make you feel a bit queasy?