export

(redirected from Exportables)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Export

A good produced in one country and sold to a customer in another country. Exports bring money into the producing country; for that reason, many economists believe that a nation's proper balance of trade means more exports are sold than imports bought. Exports may be difficult to sell in some countries, as the importers may put up various protectionist measures such as import quotas and tariffs. Most governments seek to promote exports, while they have differing positions on imports. See also: Free trade, NAFTA.

export

A good or service that is produced in one country and then sold to and consumed in another country. Because many companies are heavily dependent on exports for sales, any factors such as government policies or exchange rates that affect exports can have significant impact on corporate profits. Compare import. See also balance of trade.

export

  1. a good which is produced in the home country and which is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market earning foreign exchange for the home country (visible export).
  2. a service which is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example visits by tourists) or overseas (for example banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country (invisible export).
  3. capital which is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets, and banking deposits (capital export). See FOREIGN INVESTMENT.

    Together these items comprise, along with IMPORTS, a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS. See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORTING, EXPORT CREDIT GUARANTEE DEPARTMENT, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, EXPORT SUBSIDY.

Exportclick for a larger image
Fig. 68 Export. (a) UK goods and services exports, 2003.

(b) Geographical distribution of UK goods/services exports, 2003. Source: UK Balance of Payments, ONS, 2004.

export

a good, service or capital asset that is sold to foreign countries. (i) A good that is produced in the home country and is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market, earning foreign exchange for the home country, is called a visible export. (ii) A service that is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example, visits by tourists) or overseas (for example, banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country is called an invisible export. (iii) Capital that is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets and banking deposits is called a capital export. Exports are important in two main respects:
  1. together with IMPORTS they make up a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS - a country must export in order to finance (‘pay for’ in foreign currency terms) its imports. The combined net payment figures (exports minus imports) for (i), (ii) and (iii) are shown in Fig. 13 (a), BALANCE OF PAYMENTS entry.
  2. they represent an ‘injection’ into the CIRCULAR FLOW OF NATIONAL INCOME, serving to raise real income and output. In 2003, exports accounted for 20% of gross final expenditure (GFE) on domestically produced output (GFE minus imports = GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). See Fig. 133 (b) , NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS entry Fig. 68 gives details of the product composition and geographical distribution of UK (merchandise) goods exports in 2003. See Fig. 84 , for comparable import data (IMPORT entry). See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORT MULTIPLIER, C.I.F. ( COST- INSURANCE-FREIGHT), F.O.B. ( FREE-ONBOARD), CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN, INSURANCE, FACTORING, FORFAITING, EXPORT SUBSIDY, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, FOREIGN INVESTMENT, EXCHANGE RATE, EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE, TERMS OF TRADE.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Edwards's [1988] model, wages are expressed in terms of exportables rather than nontraded goods.
This is because the fact that the true protection to exportables is actually increasing cannot be exploited in the analysis.
x] refer to worker demand for importables and exportables respectively.
The change in the rate of true protection to exportables (this variable does not appear in models that do not have nontraded goods).
This implies that if the share of importables is greater than or equal to that of exportables in a worker's consumption basket, trade liberalization will be welfare improving if (1) wages increase with trade liberalization (i.
2) If the cross price elasticity of demand between nontradeables and importables is equal to that between exportables,
3) The cross price elasticity of demand between nontradeables and importables is less than that between exportables and importables but this difference is higher than the relative difference in the slope of the labor demand curve of exportable and importable sector.
In those papers, the fact that the true rate of protection of exportables increases, following trade liberalization of importables, could not be exploited in the analysis.
8) If the compensated elasticities of demand for nontradeables with respect to the price of importables and exportables are both zero, then the price effect is exactly equal to the compensated income effect.
T] curve to represent labor supply in exportables and importables, taking the nontraded goods sector from the opposite origin.
In this paper, by taking the nontraded good as the numeraire instead of the exportable commodity, we are able to demonstrate that the results obtained in earlier studies, specifically with regard to wages relative to the price of nontradeables, are only one of the possible effects of trade liberalization and the characteristics of the final outcome is actually contingent on certain inherent demand and production conditions prevalent in the economy.
The higher the slope of the labor demand curve in the exportable sector relative to that in the importable sector at the initial equilibrium employment level.