Export Administration Act of 1979

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Export Administration Act of 1979

Legislation in the United States that gave the president the authority to control exports to other countries when national security and/or short supply demand it. The Act expired in 1994 but its regulations have been renewed by executive order every year since. Since 1990, the Act has not applied to agricultural products under some circumstances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through the Export Administration Act (EAA), the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA), and other authority, Congress has delegated to the executive branch its express constitutional authority to regulate foreign commerce by controlling exports.
"It is just this sort of predicament that Congress intended to address in the Export Administration Act by means of temporary export controls and monitoring of exports and contracts for exports."
Exports are regulated under several different statutes, including the Export Administration Act, the Arms Export Control Act, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and the Trading with the Enemy Act.
export-control laws, specifically supporting early passage of a revised Export Administration Act that would take into account the changes in technology and in the international marketplace, as well as defense-acquisition practices.
Last year, President Bush issued EO 13,222, (19) which declared a national emergency relating to the expiration of the Export Administration Act of 1979.
These "antiboycott" laws are the 1977 amendments to the Export Administration Act of 1969 and the Ribicoff Amendment to the Tax Reform Act of 1976.
The Export Administration Act governs the export of goods and technology described in the Commerce Control List (CCL).
A new Export Administration Act will need to balance stakeholder interests, assess the national security risks presented by end users, and balance the needs of exporters with foreign policy and national security interests.
Congress is in the process of updating the Export Administration Act of 1979, which expires in August 2001.
5239, reauthorizing the Export Administration Act (EAA) of 1979 until August 20, 2001.
(1) Another example of needless complexity is the international boycott provisions of section 999, which generally duplicate the Export Administration Act and impose an unnecessary burden on U.S.