Explicit tax

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Explicit tax

A tax specifically collected by a government; includes income, withholding, property, sales, and value-added taxes and tariffs.

Explicit Tax

A tax levied and collected by a government. Examples include income tax, value added tax, sales tax, estate tax, and so forth. This compares to hidden regulatory fees, which add to the cost of doing business without necessarily adding to government revenue. For example, some argue for a carbon tax that would, theoretically, increase government revenue by taxing the emission of carbon dioxide. This compares to a proposed cap-and-trade system, which requires carbon emitters to buy permission to emit without changing how they are actually taxed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in addition to anchoring the monetary regime, stabilization requires eliminating the budget deficit through fiscal reform in which explicit taxes are substituted for the inflation tax and expenditures are brought into line with expected revenue.
explicit taxes in applying the pre-tax profit test as a particular
Explicit taxes. Everyone is familiar with any number of pecuniary taxes; governments both within and outside the United States impose explicit pecuniary taxes in hundreds if not thousands of ways.
If a single woman leaves welfare to take a job, the combination of explicit taxes and lost benefits will yield marginal tax rates approaching 80 percent--an affront to those serious about working their way to a better life.
Maydew (2001) defines tax capitalization "as the effect of taxes on prices when current prices are lower than they otherwise would be because of future explicit taxes on those assets." Maydew (2001) links tax capitalization to the Scholes et al.
There are no explicit taxes, so these are also nominal prices paid by consumers.
Where, [bar.Y], [bar.W] and S are already defined; T stands for all types of implicit and explicit taxes; Z for all types of subsidies; I for inequalities in wealth and income distribution within an economy; and IN for all other intersectoral inequalities such as in the allocation of subsidies, development expenditure and credit, in terms of trade, and even in protection of life, property and honour.
Taxpayers taxable at different rates will pay explicit taxes at different amounts and rates.
Those prices are before explicit taxes, but they are after implicit taxes.
If explicit taxes are ignored, then this ratio will be less than 1, consistent with USOs being less desirable investments, and one would expect banks to hold less of them.
Thus, rather than being "mainly concerned with explicit taxes," policy makers should "also consider implicit taxes to provide a complete picture of the total tax burden" (C&W 1999, 2).
Under perfect competition, an increase in tax preferences, leading to a decrease in pre-tax return, will give rise to an increased implicit tax, sufficient to offset the reduction in explicit taxes. Under less-than-perfectly competitive market structures, this offset will be less than perfect: firms will retain some of the explicit tax savings for themselves.