Total Expense Ratio

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Total Expense Ratio

A measure of an investment fund's costs of operation as a percentage of its total assets. It is calculated by dividing the fund's total costs by its total assets. As the total costs include things like management fees and commissions, the total expense ratio is important to determining the actual return on a fund. For example, a mutual fund may have a 10% return per year, which is quite high; however, if the total expense ratio is 8%, this means that shareholders only receive 2% of the return. It is also called the management expense ratio or simply the expense ratio.

Total Expense Ratio

The ratio of total housing expense to borrower income.

This ratio is used (along with other factors) in qualifying borrowers. See Qualification/Meeting Income Requirements/Expense Ratios.
References in periodicals archive ?
The benchmark case where reserve distributions are estimated without considering the policy-year structures of expense ratios and surrender rates is the one that assume [Exp.
Vanguard has set up introduced seven bond index funds with ETF Shares featuring expense ratios of 0.
Average expense ratios of funds of funds declined for the fourth consecutive year, falling 1 basis point to 91 basis points.
Here's how the truth can defeat the naive thinking that lower expense ratios are always good.
This hides the underlying expense ratios of the annuities.
Due to the fact that credit unions are also increasing the size of their balance sheets, operating expense ratios have declined.
He added that with expense ratios that now run from nine to 29 basis points, the expense reductions on the six equity index funds average more than 50%.
Expense ratios vary widely and directly impact your return.
If initial growth in size could provide cost advantages in terms of brokerage costs and research expenses, large funds could have lower expense ratios than small funds:
The days of property/casualty companies having expense ratios of 25, 30 or even higher are numbered if even one company can find a better way.
But Culloton said expense ratios aren't always enough incentive to invest in ETFs.
Insurers have sought to reduce expense ratios through greater dependence on technology, streamlining the back office, spreading fixed costs over a broader base of business, and cutting facilities and personnel, with mixed results.