Expatriate

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Expatriate

An employee who is a U.S. citizen living and working in a foreign country.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Expatriate

An employee at a company who is a citizen of another country. Some governments require companies hiring expatriates to show cause that the job could not be performed by a local citizen. Expatriates are generally subject to taxation only in the country where they are working, though citizens of the United States often must pay American taxes as well as local taxes, depending on their levels of income. See also: Foreign Tax Credit.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
He has thus understood from the outset the importance of allowing locals to largely determine the destiny of both Asda and Wal-Mart Germany, while insisting that expatriots remain in the background.
Un-uh!" [Confessions of some gruntled USA "expatriots"]
"At that time Paris was the capitol of the art world, filled with expatriots and salons," recalls Shankar.
Legend Allan McGraw also revealed that pledges worth around pounds 200,000 from expatriots all around the world might save the financially stricken club.
For example, Estonia was slower than Lithuania due to lower death rates in World War II and due to Estonia allowing expatriots to claim property.
They are Kilmarnock and Spain's Athletic Bilbao, ironically a club established by English expatriots.
In turn, expatriots from Tivoli founded Dazel, another software firm, in a process typifying a regionally based genesis of new related technology companies.
Any of them could be starting or folding newsletters at any given point in time, as well as publishing books (Agora has over 300 titles in print) and special reports, producing videos, putting on conferences or leading "Discovery Tours" to such financial havens as Ireland, Panama, Honduras, Belize, Nicaragua or Costa Rica where his subscribers - flirting with becoming expatriots - are bombarded by local business leaders, government officials, lawyers and economists with facts about everything from the economy, how to start or buy a business, real estate opportunities to tax advantages and acquiring dual passports.
The "Confederados" were Southern expatriots, but the also were former Americans, and the latter, sometimes more so than the former, seems to have been a source for their acceptance and status in Brazil.
In 1972, 20 American trade pioneers attended the fair and quickly were lost among the 21,000 attendees, mostly Chinese expatriots from Hong Kong.
Expatriots in their own country, the newcomers have a keener need to show attachment, belonging, knowledge of their whereabouts.