Nonprofit Organization

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Related to Exempt Organization: Tax Exempt Organizations, Tax exempt status, 501c

Nonprofit Organization

An organization that operates as if it were a business but does not seek a profit. Common examples of nonprofits include charities, private schools, and think tanks. Nonprofits do not pay taxes; donations to many are tax-deductible, at least up to certain limits. In order to qualify for this status, however, a nonprofit must register with the IRS, under section 501(c) of the tax code. See also: 403(b).
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, if an exempt organization invested in a partnership that generated gross income by operating a factory and the partnership also received dividend income from a corporate investment, the exempt organization would report only the factory income as UBTI (Regs.
In Revenue Ruling 98-15, the Service considered two different factual scenarios in which an exempt organization formed a limited liability company with a private entity.
Almost as an aside, the Ruling concludes that payments for the use of parking spaces would not be excluded from unrelated business taxable income under IRC Section 512(b)(3) if the taxpayer were an exempt organization.
Whole joint ventures involve all or substantially all of the assets of an exempt organization.
Many states allow an exempt organization to carry over a net operating loss but may impose additional restrictions or modifications.
Tax exempt organizations (EO) were generally not required to file the new form at the time they apply for tax exempt status, said Williams.
To determine the time span of the activity, the Tax Court considered the business of selling advertising space and decided that, for the purposes of determining whether the organization "regularly carried on" the business of selling program advertising, the program publisher's activities should be attributed to those of the exempt organization.
Government officials, including members of Congress, Treasury and IRS officials, and state attorneys general, have focused attention on income-producing exempt organization activities.
Partnerships, generally, and low-income housing partnerships, specifically, have been controversial in the exempt organization world for a long time.
Correction, under the act, means undoing the excess benefit to the extent possible and taking any additional measures necessary to place the exempt organization in a financial position not worse than it would have been if the disqualified person were dealing under the highest fiduciary standards.
The filing exempt organization is required to report only the activities that it performed directly, or those performed indirectly through a disregarded entity or joint venture taxed as a partnership.