Execution


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Execution

The process of completing an order to buy or sell securities. Once a trade is executed, it is reported by a Confirmation Report; settlement (payment and transfer of ownership) occurs in the U.S. between one (mutual funds) and three (stocks) days after an order is executed. The time varies greatly across countries. In France, for example settlements are only once per month.

Execution

The act of filling an order to buy or sell a security. That is, when a broker executes an order, he/she actually makes a trade on behalf of the client. The date of execution is known as the trade date.

execution

The consummation of a security trade.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Paternoster, a professor of criminal justice at the University of Maryland, provides valuable insights on such troubling topics as the blatant racial bias in the application of death sentences, the execution of juveniles, the costs of capital punishment vis-a-vis life imprisonment, and the perpetual efforts to square the death penalty with the Eighth Amendment's ban on "cruel and unusual punishment.
Kennedy, a former 9th Circuit judge, scolded the lower-court judges for rejecting Thompson's plea - and then reversing themselves 53 days later, halting Thompson's execution after almost 13 years of state and federal appeals of his conviction.
A doctor present at the execution noted that Medina had already lurched up in his seat and balled up his fists - the normal reaction to high voltage, which causes the flexor muscles of the hands to contract in a claw-like grip.
Also know that you will not see Jenkins' execution during ``A Kill for a Kill.
almost followed in Mason's steps, writing an obscenity-laced letter that demanded, "Give me my execution date and kill me" State officials offered to oblige, but the execution was postponed when Kirkpatrick changed his mind.
Those friends, who were not identified, were invited by Bonin to witness the execution.
Bill Clinton's reply to Fielding Dawson - on White House stationery and bearing what appears to be the President's signature - begins by asserting, "In state cases such as Gary Graham's, there is no legal basis for the President to intervene to prevent an execution.