Ethics

(redirected from Ethicists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another reason, more particular to ethics consultation, for clinical ethicists to be concerned about potential liability is well articulated by William dePender and Wanda Ikeda-Chandler.
I would recommend this book highly not only to those who are working on HIV/AIDS in one way or another, but also to ethicists and theologians in general.
These ethicists conclude that we must think carefully and at a fundamental level about the changing definition of reproductive material and the changing meaning of reproductive activity.
Though in many cases their advice is no more than common sense, professional ethicists "have done some good," Marino believes.
In addition to being "overworked and overwhelmed" as one ethicist put it, IRB members must endure what amounts to begrudging tolerance among researchers.
"The job of a clinical ethicist doesn't actually exist in the NHS - although they are common in countries like America and Australia.
Many care ethicists are skeptical about care ethics' compatibility with educational services offered primarily via markets.
"As ethicists, I think we really have to call for a new responsible way...
We should permit machines to function autonomously only in areas where there is agreement among ethicists about what constitutes acceptable behavior.
He charges that contemporary virtue ethicists have neglected imperative ethical questions that Plato and Aristotle engage, such as "what is a human being," "what is a human being for," and "what is the source of normativity in ethics." Indeed, Sanford not only reintroduces these questions into contemporary virtue ethics, challenging the assumptions many virtue ethicists make concerning the basic tasks of moral philosophy, but he also ventures precursory answers to these questions in the latter half of the book.
Theologians and Christian ethicists in a number of countries engage with Protestant figures and theological claims, and reflect on whether these have any enduring value.
After two introductory essays (part I), the topics covered are set in the contexts of the public sphere (part II), the family (part III), and personal interior life (part IV) and reflect a pattern found in the discussion of the nature of virtue by contemporary virtue ethicists. These contexts form concentric circles of human relationship in which corresponding virtues are cultivated in order to maintain the relationships within these spheres.