Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Given these affinities, one might be puzzled why Ibn Taymiyya finds Ash'arite ethical theory to be so offensive.
Part 2, titled "What Ought I to Do" segues into Chapter 6, "Biology, Psychology, and Ethical Theory," and introduces the plot summary of the film Cast Away (2000).
* Recall and understand several approaches to professional ethics, including utilitarian ethics, virtue-based ethical theory, and moral motivation theory.
The problem the authors note is that the search for a perfect ethical theory is centuries old--actually, I would note, it is millennia old--so it is unlikely that we will anytime soon have a universally acceptable ethical theory.
But prior to their publication, MacIntyre had already decided on a historical approach to the understanding of ethical theory that appears in his A Short History of Ethics, which employs a combination of historical and sociological approaches to describe the course of ethical theory in the West, proceeding from the ancient Greeks to the medievals, to the Scottish Enlightenment, Kant, utilitarianism, and twentieth-century ethicists including G.
Communicative ethical theory puts dialogue at the centre of decision-making processes and attempts to answer the question: how does this view influence our understanding of moral development as a manifestation of dialogue/communication?
The nearest approach to ethical theory in Buddhism can be seen in the Vinaya where cases are grouped together under rubrics in the manner of casuistry but without progressing to the stage of fully-fledged theory.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory going back to Jeremy Bentham (2009), James Mill (1829), John Stuart Mill (2002) and others.
A more mixed assessment of applied ethical theory was given by David Carr (2000).
In order to effectively meet the objectives of ethics education, students should be taught ethical theory (Armstrong, 1993; Loeb, 1988).
In Levinas and the Cinema of Redemption: Time, Ethics, and the Feminine, Sam B Girgus develops an ethical analytic for cinema by recovering the ethical theory of Emmanuel Levinas, which he argues is dramatized in a multinational canon of films that he terms 'the cinema of redemption'.
They refer to the application of ethical theories to concrete cases as practical ethics, stating 'We have not attempted a general ethical theory and do not claim that our principles mimic, are analogous to or substitute for the foundational principles in leading classical theories.' They go on to say that 'even the core principles of our account are so scant that they cannot provide an adequate basis for deducing most of what we can justifiably claim to know in the moral life'.