ethical investing


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Ethical Investing

Any investment philosophy that recommends investment decisions based upon a decision's ethical implications for individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking, and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethical investing may be both positive and negative; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not make investments (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds, and even whole subdivisions of companies, are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.

ethical investing

References in periodicals archive ?
If all these criteria are met and the FTSE4Good index succeeds in increasing the pressure, then ethical investing will no longer be a separate issue.
Ethical investing is big business and is only going to get bigger.
And the growth in ethical investing - at one time the preserve solely of the pious and idealistic - is highlighted by the fact that in Britain alone last year the amount of cash that found its way into new generation specialist funds rose by 27 per cent to pounds 3.3 billion.
Ethical investing has boomed in the late 1990s, with more than pounds 1.3 billion of funds now reckoned to be in "green" trusts in the UK alone.
The boom in ethical investing this year has been helped by four new funds launched in the last six months.
One particular example where ethical investing comes into play is in the area of Gene Therapy.
Traditionally, ethical investing meant buying stocks of companies that are not involved in alcohol, tobacco, armaments or gambling, or investing in businesses that helped the environment or supported positive social causes.
The whole concept of ethical investing is very subjective and to find the best fit as a caring investor you must first examine the causes you care about and have a vision of the world you want to live in.
According to Investopedia (investopedia.com/terms/e/environmental-social-and-governance-esg-criteria.asp), the criteria for ESG are "a set of standards for a company's operations that socially conscious investors use to screen potential investments." Other terms used to describe ESG include sustainable investing, responsible investing, ethical investing, impact investing, and socially responsible investing.
"A lot of investors talk about ethical investing but when it comes to Hikvision and Xinjiang they are happy to fill their boots.
Those interests are unlimited and can range from gardening clubs, to social justice issues, political campaigning, ethical investing, or creativity through the arts.