Equilibrium


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Related to Equilibrium: Equilibrium of forces

Equilibrium

The stable state of the system. See: Attractor.

Equilibrium

A state of stable prices brought about by the rough equality of supply and demand. This applies for consumer goods, securities, and most other goods and services.

equilibrium

a state of balance with no tendency to change. See EQUILIBRIUM MARKET PRICE, EQUILIBRIUM LEVEL OF NATIONAL INCOME, DISEQUILIBRIUM.
References in periodicals archive ?
7) According to the definition, the vacant space associated with market equilibrium is allocated between the "space needed to service the market friction of normal tenant movements" and "space needed to accommodate new demand coming into the market.
10) This component of equilibrium is based on the demand characteristics of a market--the greater the anticipated demand, the greater the required future supply, and the greater the current equilibrium vacancy rate.
The qualitative features of the separating equilibrium in the setting of Rothschild and Stiglitz (1976) are therefore robust to the introduction of low levels of regret aversion for low-risk individuals and the correlation between the level of insurance coverage and risk type is positive.
For low levels of regret aversion, the separating equilibrium only changes insofar as high-risk, regret-averse individuals are partially covered by the contract that they obtain in equilibrium under full information.
Stable, unstable, and neutral states of equilibrium are typically found in rigid bodies rather than in animate objects.
Without some degree of instability, it would be impossible to move; however, without some degree of stability, it would be impossible to maintain equilibrium or to remain upright.
A self-countering n-tuple is called an equilibrium point.
Starting from the second stage of the game, equilibrium in prices is discussed now.
These include describing first-order linear vector stochastic difference equations as the building block for a class of economic structures with competitive equilibrium prices and quantities; and explaining fast algorithms, like the doubling algorithm, for computing the value function and optimal decision rule of social planning problems.
Chapter three discusses the methodology related to the mainstream, neoclassical equilibrium concept.
These are the questions that Bert Tieben has attempted to answer in his recently published The Concept of Equilibrium in Different Economic Traditions: An Historical Investigation (2012).
A recent result in Roughgarden (2009) compares the worst correlated equilibrium to the social optimum.