Endangered Species Act

(redirected from Endangered Species Act of 1973)
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Endangered Species Act

A federal law originally intended to protect endangered species on federal land, but expanded to include protections wherever found, including private property.The existence of a protected species on one's land may prevent development or dramatically increase the expenses.This is not considered a condemnation,so there is no government compensation.

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References in periodicals archive ?
reason why the holdings of at least Strahan and Loggerhead Turtle should be limited or overturned."); see also Endangered Species Act of 1973 [section] 11, 16 U.S.C.
Lachenmeier, Student Article, The Endangered Species Act of 1973: Preservation or Pandemonium?, 5 ENVTL.
(38) Richard Mallory, Obligations of Federal Agencies Under Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, 28 STAN.
The Endangered Species Act of 1973 ("the Act") created a framework for the preservation of endangered plants and animals in the United States.
That's how the Endangered Species Act of 1973 can work when the right people get behind it.
For two decades, the government has been using its power under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C.
And yet, we adopted the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which is generally regarded throughout the globe as the most farreaching, progressive, and enlightened law to protect biological diversity.
The premise is that the Endangered Species Act of 1973 is not really saving endangered species.
Amending the original Endangered Species Act of 1973, the bill increases annual funding for plant and aminal protection from about $30 million currently to $66 million by 1992.
(157) Endangered Species Act of 1973, 16 U.S.C [section][section] 1531-1544 (2012).
The species first gained federal protection under the Endangered Species Preservation Act in March 1967, and maintained its endangered status under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which offered better habitat protections for the imperiled species.

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