agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Request TOC of this Report- https://www.factmr.com/connectus/sample?flag=T&rep_id=3716 Fluid lecithin is a naturally occurring mixture used as an emulsifying agent in food & beverages applications to maintain stable emulsion between unmixable liquids.
It should be emphasized, however, that sufficient concentration of the emulsifying agent must be included in the emulsion system to cover all the dispersed globules.
As you apply the Balm to your face, its emulsifying agents attach to oil-based debris on the skin, readying them for removal.
The first of its type in the U.S., the new plant is capable of producing 100 percent renewable, 100 percent bio-based non-ionic surfactants, which are active emulsifying agents used in a wide range of consumer products.
The fire-resistant and anti-wear properties of phosphate esters make them a preferred choice in important applications, such as fire retardants, hydraulic systems, emulsifying agents, lubricants, hydrotropes in cleaning applications, corrosion inhibitors, anti-static agents, and wetting agents.
A Chef's Guide to Gelling, Thickening, and Emulsifying Agents
It is comprised of water; glycerin; a provitamin of vitamin B5; allantoin; white tea extract; blueberry extract; acai extract; at least one UVA and/or UVB screening agent; stearyl alcohol; grape seed oil; borage oil; olive oil; jojoba oil; vitamin E acetate; salicylic acid; an amino acid or a form of an amino acid; an alpha arbutin; hydrolyzed rice bran protein, oxido reductases, and/or glycine soja (soybean) protein; sodium hyaluronate; aloe or an extract from aloe; lactic acid; a dermatologically-acceptable form of silicone; one or more polyacrylamide-based emulsifying agents; vitamin A palmitate; orange oil and lemongrass oil.
Chest of Books, Types of Emulsifying Agents, http://chestofbooks.com/food/science/Experimental-Cookery/Types-Of-Emulsifiink-Agents.html
In addition, aluminum chloride and ferric chloride may be used in clay-in-water solutions to form emulsifying agents for the synthetic asphalt and modified synthetic asphalt mixtures.
Dispersions of silicone-alkyd resins in water can be stabilized by internal or external emulsifying agents. (2)
The new 40% concentration differs significantly from other water-soluble forms of CoQ10 because it does not contain emulsifying agents that can create problems once the product is in solution.
After polymerization, the polymer is separated from the solvent or from the emulsifying agents, which requires several process steps, including coagulation, stripping, various mechanical separation stages, and drying.