employer

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Employer

A person or company that hires one or more persons to perform work on a full-time or part-time basis. The employer directs where the employee performs work, what he/she does, and so forth. In general, an employer is responsible for paying a wage or salary to the employee in exchange for his/her time and/or production. An employer may be required to pay a portion of employees' taxes.

employer

an organization (firm, government, etc.) which engages EMPLOYEES to perform JOB tasks related to the types of goods and services produced by the organization. See CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT.

employer

a person or FIRM that hires (employs) LABOUR as a FACTOR INPUT in the production of a good or service. Compare EMPLOYEE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not surprisingly, as health care costs continue to increase and the costs of genetic testing decrease, employers may view genetic testing as a cost-saving technique by trying to weed out employees with genetic markers for disease.
It unsuccessfully argued that the residence was first sold to the employer, then sold by the employer to the third-party purchaser.
In addition, employers still may require employees to supply and maintain their own hand tools as long as the employee makes at least twice the minimum wage.
* Consumer-driven health plans are becoming a popular option for larger employers, although they're rarely offering them as a full replacement.
In the ruling an employer either arranges to purchase an employee's home at a certain price or contracts with a third-party relocation company to act as its agent and administer a buyout.
This article discusses the extent to which employers may be liable for the improper sexual conduct of supervisors.
However, a high interest/high influence characterization places employers in a quadrant where they are most likely not presently placed.
The smallest employers generally are keeping costs down by discouraging coverage of dependents and imposing high deductibles.
Differential payments clearly constitute income under section 61 of the Internal Revenue Code and would appear to be "wages" for purposes of federal income tax withholding (FITW), Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) taxes, and Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) taxes, because the benefits are being provided based on the employee's past employment relationship with the civilian employer. Even IRS regulations describe differential payments to military personnel as "compensation paid by other employers." (1)
Employers are liable for the actions taken by their employees in the workplace through the doctrine of vicarious liability.
For job seekers, Dentalworkers provides a quick, convenient and free way to let prospective employers view their resume.

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