employer

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Employer

A person or company that hires one or more persons to perform work on a full-time or part-time basis. The employer directs where the employee performs work, what he/she does, and so forth. In general, an employer is responsible for paying a wage or salary to the employee in exchange for his/her time and/or production. An employer may be required to pay a portion of employees' taxes.

employer

an organization (firm, government, etc.) which engages EMPLOYEES to perform JOB tasks related to the types of goods and services produced by the organization. See CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT.

employer

a person or FIRM that hires (employs) LABOUR as a FACTOR INPUT in the production of a good or service. Compare EMPLOYEE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ADA prohibits employers with 15 or more employees from discriminating against applicants or employees on the basis of a disability.
In addition, it provided three situations based on that case to explain and illustrate its position on the treatment of employer payments to RSCs.
Health promotion and wellness initiatives have come a long way from health fairs that were once the main--and sometimes only--offerings by employers.
Applying a benefits-and-burdens analysis to the above scenarios, the ruling concludes that, in the first two, the overall transaction actually resulted in two separate sales: the employee's sale of the residence to the employer and the employer's sale to the third-party buyer.
While these terms are not found within Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, their role in determining whether an employer should be held liable became well established.
Compliant employers want to tell a jury that they did all they reasonably could to avoid, detect and correct sexually harassing behavior.
But, educational institutions that listen to employers and are willing to think through with them how needed skill sets can find a home within the academy will have accomplished several critical goals.
The smallest employers have been the first to shift costs, but survey results suggest that the larger ones are following suit.
Alternatively, employers may want to consider asking the IRS for a ruling to confirm the agency's decision to continue its reliance on Rev.
But Garamendi's plan would also extend the time for employers to file their challenges to one year, up from 90 days.
Employers are generally sale if they get the applicant's written consent to the background check and investigate only information relevant to the job.
As noted at the outset, assessment of student leaming outcomes can provide valuable information to students, employers, budgetary decision-makers, and other key stakeholders.

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