employer

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Employer

A person or company that hires one or more persons to perform work on a full-time or part-time basis. The employer directs where the employee performs work, what he/she does, and so forth. In general, an employer is responsible for paying a wage or salary to the employee in exchange for his/her time and/or production. An employer may be required to pay a portion of employees' taxes.

employer

an organization (firm, government, etc.) which engages EMPLOYEES to perform JOB tasks related to the types of goods and services produced by the organization. See CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT.

employer

a person or FIRM that hires (employs) LABOUR as a FACTOR INPUT in the production of a good or service. Compare EMPLOYEE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The survey found that employers continue to overlook the high value that employees place on retirement benefits compared to salary.
Under a home purchase program, an employer relocating an employee arranges to purchase the latter's home at a certain price; alternatively, the employer may contract with a third-party relocation company to administer a buyout on its behalf.
Time spent by employees training to maintain their proficiency or to do their job better will count toward hours of service to their employers.
The bill would have put a limit on the ability of insurers and employers to use genetic information, but was opposed by Republican leadership, backed by employers and the insurance industry.
The employer paid a fee to the RSC, and reimbursed it for any expenses and losses associated with maintaining and selling the property.
While solutions such as redesigning benefits packages and sharing more costs with employees are driving down costs for some employers, Steurer said for others, wellness initiatives are turning out to be an even more effective way to lower claims costs.
If such an offer is made, the employer through its agent--purchases the home at the higher bid price.
As a result of these cases, employers are vicariously liable for the sexually harassing conduct of their supervisors visa-vis subordinate employees regardless of whether the employer knew of the conduct and regardless of what type of sexual harassment is involved.
Employers who have not yet conducted the training should schedule it now.
Given the diversity among employers and the wide-ranging jobs into which graduates will be placed, this is no small task.
The dilemma for mid-sized employers is that they must compete with the largest employers for labor, and thus must offer a comparable benefit package.
It simply is not clear whether the relationship has in fact been interrupted when civilian employers are more generous than what appears to have been contemplated by IRS rulings or by federal law guaranteeing reemployment and the protection of certain health and pension benefits to veterans.

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