employer


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Employer

A person or company that hires one or more persons to perform work on a full-time or part-time basis. The employer directs where the employee performs work, what he/she does, and so forth. In general, an employer is responsible for paying a wage or salary to the employee in exchange for his/her time and/or production. An employer may be required to pay a portion of employees' taxes.

employer

an organization (firm, government, etc.) which engages EMPLOYEES to perform JOB tasks related to the types of goods and services produced by the organization. See CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT.

employer

a person or FIRM that hires (employs) LABOUR as a FACTOR INPUT in the production of a good or service. Compare EMPLOYEE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most states also restrict employer access to genetic information, as well as performing or administering genetic tests.
The employer paid a fee to the RSC, and reimbursed it for any expenses and losses associated with maintaining and selling the property.
Among the key areas of the proposed regulations are: (1) Independent contractors must be counted as part of the workforce and trained; (2) Training with a prior employer within the two-year window may qualify; (3) Retraining generally would be permissible sometime during a "training year," instead of exactly two years for each person; (4) Training would be required only of supervisors located in California; and (5) "Subject matter expert" and other qualifications for trainers are listed.
* Consumer-driven health plans are becoming a popular option for larger employers, although they're rarely offering them as a full replacement.
If such an offer is made, the employer through its agent--purchases the home at the higher bid price.
Employers have been held to a strict standard of liability, referred to as vicarious liability, for the sexually harassing conduct of supervisors, enabling employees alleging they were the victims of sexual harassment to hold employers liable without the need to establish knowledge or constructive knowledge of the offending conduct and failure to remedy it on the part of the employer.
As the preeminent association of business tax executives, TEI commends the Treasury Department and IRS for recognizing that the application of section 10.35 to in-house tax practitioners would have raised numerous issues and might have impaired the provision of sound and timely tax advice to the practitioner's employer. We agree that written advice provided by in-house counsel should be excluded from the definition of a covered opinion under section 10.35 and that the other provisions of Circular 230, especially section 10.37, adequately address the professional responsibility of in-house counsel when providing advice to the employer.
The smallest employers generally are keeping costs down by discouraging coverage of dependents and imposing high deductibles.
Employees generally understand the need for such action, particularly if the employer conducts the search in a manner that respects employee dignity.
However, if the harassment does not involve one of these tangible actions, an employer may be able to limit or avoid liability by showing that he/she exercised reasonable care to prevent and correct any harassing behavior in a timely fashion and that the employee then unreasonably failed to take advantage of any preventive or corrective actions provided by the employer to remedy harm.
Go online to http://dentalworkers.com and register free as either a worker or an employer. Questions should be directed to info@dentalworkers.com or call 877-235-9855.

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