Carbon Trade

(redirected from Emissions trading)
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Related to Emissions trading: Carbon trading, emission permits

Carbon Trade

A market proposed by the Kyoto Protocol in which each country participating receives a limit on the carbon emissions it and companies operating in it are allowed to produce. Countries (and/or companies) may buy and sell the emissions limits assigned to them. Carbon trade is intended to be an attempt to reduce overall carbon emissions while still allowing companies that may have difficulty doing so to have an outlet for transition. It is also called emissions trading.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the US Senate has at last been debating its version of a long-promised emissions trading scheme, with a bill being published this May.
They include ensuring the cap is set at the right level, expanding emissions trading to include aviation and shipping - ideally through a global scheme for those sectors - and protecting firms at risk of carbon leakage, while ensuring measures are focused on those sectors which genuinely need protection.
He called for emissions trading to be introduced globally rather than regionally.
IREM supports federal funding of a cost/benefit analysis and research into the feasibility of an emissions trading program for the real estate industry.
Prime Minister Helen Clark said yesterday the delay until January 2011 in imposing the emissions trading scheme would help protect consumers.
The growing interest in emissions trading systems corresponds to a
In 2005, the European Union launched a greenhouse gas Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), the largest emission trading program in the world.
Following chapters reviewing the history of the framework to date and examining the role of the EU-Russia Partnership and Cooperation Agreement in Russian ratification of Kyoto, eight chapters examine various aspects of the European Parliament's Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Directive, including member state difficulties in drawing up national allocation plans, the industry liability regime for member state failure, the allocation process within the emissions trading system, links between Kyoto's project mechanisms and the EU trading scheme, the relationship between emissions trading and public rights regarding environmental policy, and provisions for enforcement.
So the protocol's red-faced host country is bumping up its involvement in the treaty's three mechanisms: Joint Implementation, the Clean Development Mechanism and Carbon Emissions Trading.
But we strongly disagree with her deprecating view of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading and her implicit endorsement of "conventional methods of stemming pollution": command-and-control regulation.

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