Elizur Wright


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Elizur Wright

An American mathematician. He developed the first modern mortality tables to determine premiums, which helped ensure that life insurance remained a viable business model. He was also a noted abolitionist. Wright lived from 1804 to 1885.
References in periodicals archive ?
(26.) For example, Elizur Wright to Liberator, Sept.
(29.) Elizur Wright Jr., The Sin of Slavery, and Its Remedy: Containing Some Reflections on the Moral Influences of African Colonization (New York: n.p., 1833), 21; Gerrit Smith, Speeches of Gerrit Smith, in Congress, 1853-'4 (Washington, D.C.: Buell and Blanchard, 1854), 8-9.
(59.) Some examples would be Elihu Burritt in Littell's Living Age 53 (June 1857): 753-54; Henry Cowles to Elizur Wright, Jan.
Elizur Wright, who led a Chamber delegation that testified in the bill's favor before the House Judiciary Committee, complained that the absence of three committee members doomed the legislation.
Wright, Elizur Wright, The Father of Life Insurance (n.
Framing the Rules: In the mid-1800s Elizur Wright and William Barnes, working independently of each other, created the initial footprint of the rules contemporary insurers follow.
The first scholarly biography of Elizur Wright presents a comprehensive and stimulating account of an important reformer of the nineteenth century.
Huebner, the founder of The American College and creator of the Chartered Life Underwriters certification and Elizur Wright, the first insurance commissioner in the United States, were inducted as the first laureates.
The need for a standard nonforfeiture law was first identified in the mid-1800s by Elizur Wright, an actuary who was insurance commissioner of Massachusetts.