Grass

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Related to Elephant Grass: Pennisetum purpureum

Grass

A slang term for $10 in Hong Kong. Bowl and stripe are equivalent terms. See also: Hong Kong dollar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of chopping, additive and silo type on the quality of elephant grass (Pennisetum Purpureum) silage.
The design was completely randomized, with six treatments (silage exclusively from elephant grass and five levels of inclusion of dehydrated banana peel to elephant grass silage--5; 10; 15; 20 and 25%, based on natural matter), with four replicates in each treatment.
Humic compounds were obtained through fractionation of organic materials and extraction of fulvic and humic acids, which were adopted from IHSS (The International Humic Substances Society) that included: ten (10) g aerated dry compost (Centrosema pubescens, elephant grass, and chicken manure composts) was put into 250 ml centrifuge bottle, and then added 100 ml 0.
In order to promote grass carp growth, higher initial weight of this species is recommended; hence improved consumption of elephant grass would result in better growth of this species.
Elephant grass varieties are commonly used in a cut-and carry system which makes for a feedstock that can be fed in stalls.
2010c) did not obtain significant phosphorus removal, where the effluent concentration was greater than that of the influent applied to CWS cultured with Tifton and elephant grass for the treatment of dairy wastewater.
The results of the study showed that Vetiver grass attained the highest sprouting percentage (93%) followed by Elephant grass (88%) during first observation (1st May, 2006) while on second observation (2nd June, 2006), Elephant grass got the top position with 90 percent sprouting (Table 2).
For internal anatomical characterization, six blades each of elephant grass and signal grass with signs of injury were collected.
Changes in elephant grass plant components with maturity: II.
Their work - called Where The Wild Things Were - is formed by a series of eight metre-high etched stainless steel and composite blades which sway in the wind and evoke the Elephant Grass found in Africa and Asia, an example of the exotic from far-off lands which Salford Quays helped to bring to Manchester.
Bio-coal briquette using elephant grass is very effective.