Burglary

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Burglary

The act of entering a building unlawfully with the intention of committing a crime, usually but not always theft. Burglary is illegal in nearly every jurisdiction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inferred Intent Based on the Elements of the Offenses and Their
(132) Federal statutes "usually list all offense elements 'in a single sentence' and separate the sentencing factors 'into subsections.'" (133) In [section] 924(c)(1)(A), the word "shall" at the end of the main paragraph separates the elements of the offense from the sentencing factors.
In this situation there would be a deprivation of liberty; therefore a conviction without proof of all the elements of the offense is an infringement of s.
The first step in determining whether unanimity is required as to predicate acts is to ascertain whether the legislature, in defining the compound-complex crime at issue, intended the predicate acts to be principal elements of the offense or mere alternative means of fulfilling the series or pattern element of the crime.(74) This question has arisen most explicitly and contentiously in the context of the CCE.
These persons, whom I will label "Intentional S-D Killers," are, indeed, acquitted because they were "justified" in their actions rather than because the government failed to prove commission of the elements of the offense.
2000) (explaining that the prosecution bears the burden of proving "all elements of the offense," which in that case meant that the state must prove that "the person whom the defendant knowingly induced ...
He's more comfortable in space than in the pocket, and some of the new elements of the offense will focus on that.'
299 (1932), focuses on whether the "same elements of the offense are involved in both prosecutions." The second test, established in Grady, requires courts to determine if the "same conduct" is involved in both prosecutions.
Basic elements of the offense to include the evidence in order to meet the requirements of the Court," he further explained.
This conclusion is reinforced by the state-court judgment specifying that Guevara-Solorzano's conviction was for a Class D Felony and by Tennessee case law, which indicates that the type and quantity of drugs are elements of the offense that must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.<br />Based on Moncrieffe v.
What is more, the charges against De Lima were for illegal trade in drugs, which requires that the evidence should include 'the essential elements of the offense charged' (names of buyers, sellers, and the most essential: the illegal drugs traded).
"I think there's a total lack of proof in terms of at least two elements of the offense and I firmly suspect the judge will enter a directed finding of not guilty," Ekl said outside court.