Electronic Communications Privacy Act

(redirected from Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986)

Electronic Communications Privacy Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1986, that protects most communication sent over a computer network from search or seizure without a warrant. The Act requires law enforcement officials to abide by the same requirements for computer communications as they do for telephone communications. Exemptions established by the Act, such as access to records kept by service providers, have proven controversial.
References in periodicals archive ?
the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, which was codified
But under the Stored Communications Act, a component of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, the government may order such companies to turn over customers' records using only a court order or an administrative subpoena--less than the warrant and probable cause requirements of a typical Fourth Amendment search.
24) Recognizing the need to uphold constitutional protections for information shared with another through wireless communication, Congress enacted the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA).
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA) (5) contains two parts: Title I, the Wiretap Act, which covers wire, oral, and electronic communications in transit; (6) and Title II, the Stored Communications Act (SCA), which covers communications in electronic storage.
This mistaken belief is often inaccurately based on the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986.
On the federal level, the Wiretap Act, as amended by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA), prohibits the interception, recording, and disclosure of "any wire, oral, or electronic communication" unless one of a few exceptions applies.
The Federal Wiretapping Act of 1968 and its amendment, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, prohibit most audio surveillance in the workplace.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 essentially prohibits the monitoring of wire transfers while in transit or in storage without a court order, warrant, or administrative subpoena.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA)(19) prohibits the intentional interception of wire, oral, and electronic communications.
Specht alleges that this 'continuing surveillance' and identifying cookies provides Netscape with a profile of each person's file transfers and the suit proposes that the company is in violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986.
The pertinent law here is the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986.
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