Electronic Communications Privacy Act

(redirected from Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986)

Electronic Communications Privacy Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1986, that protects most communication sent over a computer network from search or seizure without a warrant. The Act requires law enforcement officials to abide by the same requirements for computer communications as they do for telephone communications. Exemptions established by the Act, such as access to records kept by service providers, have proven controversial.
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References in periodicals archive ?
735, 743-14 (1979), superseded by statute, Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, Pub.
The initial passage of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, which (for all its faults) largely protected e-mail communications and other online interactions at a time when few Americans owned or used personal computers, is a testament to the lasting power of legislation.
In addition to the Rules, the SCA, which was enacted as a revision to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986,31 provides specific protections for parties seeking to prevent the discovery of electronic materials.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA) (5) contains two parts: Title I, the Wiretap Act, which covers wire, oral, and electronic communications in transit; (6) and Title II, the Stored Communications Act (SCA), which covers communications in electronic storage.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA) amends the Federal Wiretap Statute to provide criminal and civil penalties for the unauthorized interception or disclosure of any wire, oral, or electronic communication.
On the federal level, the Wiretap Act, as amended by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA), prohibits the interception, recording, and disclosure of "any wire, oral, or electronic communication" unless one of a few exceptions applies.
The Federal Wiretapping Act of 1968 and its amendment, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, prohibit most audio surveillance in the workplace.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 essentially prohibits the monitoring of wire transfers while in transit or in storage without a court order, warrant, or administrative subpoena.
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