induction

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Related to Electromagnetic induction: magnetic flux

induction

the initial TRAINING an employee may receive at the commencement of employment to familiarize him or her with the workings of the organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, when using electromagnetic induction for wireless power transmission, the transmit coil ([L.sub.1]) and receive coil ([L.sub.2]) both use the capacitance to simulate the L-C resonance.
Zhou, "The electrical activity of neurons subject to electromagnetic induction and Gaussian white noise," International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos, vol.
Of course, electromagnetic induction is physical science, but not rocket science; as most things in nature, it is plain and simple - discovered by a gentleman-scientist, who used to personify simplicity without cashing in on his fame or inventions.
The phenomenon of electromagnetic induction and electromagnetic essential that the phenomenon is described by Faraday's law:
Diaz L, Hcrrero J (1992) Salinity estimates in irrigated soils using electromagnetic induction. Soil Science 154, 151 157.
Equations (45) and (46) give meaning to phenomenon of electromagnetic induction: a change in magnetic flux is associated with a induced voltage which is opposed to the cause that generates it.
A constant magnetic field induces an electric field strength in a conductible cylinder rotating at constant speed according to the law of electromagnetic induction:
In the fine film processing of resins and so on, when the roll is heated by contact with a web of higher temperature, the external heat input can be controlled with mild cooling by the mist, and in conjunction with the electromagnetic induction heating of the induction coil, the setpoint temperature is precisely maintained.
RocTool, developers of heat and cool technologies for composite and plastic injection moulding, by using electromagnetic induction to heat a mould in seconds, is offering one major aerospace leader the chance to use its technologies under an exclusive worldwide license.
Electromagnetic induction eliminated friction and vibration, and the motor's simple, efficient operation opened up a wide range of applications.
Its operation is based on electromagnetic induction, where the transmitter coil, traversed by a variable current, will generate an electromotive force across the two receiver coils disposed above and below it.
In principle, the solid metal wires (Ti and Al) are first heated by a high-frequency electromagnetic induction coil, and a metal liquid droplet is formed.

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