Elective-Deferral Contribution

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Elective-Deferral Contribution

A contribution to an IRA or 401(k) made from an employee's pretax income. That is, an elective-deferral contribution is tax-deferred, meaning that the retirement account holder does not pay taxes on what goes into the account until he/she begins making withdrawals.
References in periodicals archive ?
401(k) Plan, a defined contribution plan funded by employee elective deferral contributions.
All contributions to the annuity contracts were made pursuant to salary reduction agreements and were comprised of elective deferral contributions.
The last day to make employee elective deferral contributions is 30 days after the end of the month for which the contributions are made.
This problem is in particular noted with 401(k) plans in which the employees are 100% vested in elective deferral contributions but cannot access the funds without terminating employment.
As you may be aware, the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) provided that individuals age 50 or over may make additional elective deferral contributions to retirement plans that permit elective deferrals- i.
Consequently, 401(k) elective deferral contributions will no longer need to be limited to ensure that employer deduction limits are not exceeded.
Under the old law, for purposes of the deduction limits, employee elective deferral contributions to a 401(k) plan are treated as employer contributions and as a result are subject to the generally applicable deduction limits.
However, The Principal(R) encourages both plan sponsors and their employees to look carefully before leaping into the world of Roth elective deferral contributions.
If these requirements are met, the plan is deemed to satisfy the nondiscrimination test for the employee's elective deferral contributions (i.
Department of Labor (DOL) has revised the instructions to IRS Form 5500 to require plan auditors to review the deposit of 401(k) elective deferral contributions and to confirm that the plan sponsor has deposited these contributions in a timely manner.
Self-employed individuals and corporate owners may make 401(k) elective deferral contributions and employer contributions at their discretion.