Economist

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Economist

A person, especially but not necessarily an academic, who studies how people produce, trade, and use goods and services. Economists look at how different actors, such as individuals, companies, and governments, interact with one another to maximize the fulfillment of their needs through the use of scarce resources. Economists also study supply, demand, and the relationship between the two. There are a number of schools of thought among economists. Some major schools are classical economics, which considers the sources of production as well as the role of the Invisible Hand of the market, and Marxism, which considers the exploitation of labor by holders of capital. Other, modern schools of thought include Keynesianism, which emphasizes the role of demand as opposed to supply, and monetarism, which promotes the use of the free market and considers the role of money supply in economic growth. See also: Macroeconomics, Microeconomics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The key, say the BE economists, is recognizing that community development and economic development, while closely related, are not exactly the same thing.
The economists said an easy return to the zero-rate policy could prove counterproductive, undermining the credibility of the central bank's monetary policy.
Meanwhile, sociologists and economists have borrowed from interest group theories developed by political scientists.
Presidents Bush, Clinton, and Salinas, multinational corporate executives, and a plethora of neoclassical economists assured us that NAFTA would generate jobs here in the United States as well as north and south of the border.
Business economists who can become effective policy prognosticators will have no problem finding listeners.
I would like to discuss this phenomenon by addressing three questions I am often asked by other economists and by noneconomists who are intrigued by this public function.
However, among economists who gave a response other than keeping the status quo, 71 percent favored either legalization or decriminalization.
Ramos, who joked to an audience of economists that the problem with our profession is this: 'If you put three economists in the same room, you can never get them to agree with one another.
That standard should rule out Harvard economists, both Feldstein and Summers.
Economists like to play the role of academic bad boys, making proposals that spark controversy and reveal shocking truths.