Economist

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Economist

A person, especially but not necessarily an academic, who studies how people produce, trade, and use goods and services. Economists look at how different actors, such as individuals, companies, and governments, interact with one another to maximize the fulfillment of their needs through the use of scarce resources. Economists also study supply, demand, and the relationship between the two. There are a number of schools of thought among economists. Some major schools are classical economics, which considers the sources of production as well as the role of the Invisible Hand of the market, and Marxism, which considers the exploitation of labor by holders of capital. Other, modern schools of thought include Keynesianism, which emphasizes the role of demand as opposed to supply, and monetarism, which promotes the use of the free market and considers the role of money supply in economic growth. See also: Macroeconomics, Microeconomics.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Six economists-ANZ Research economist Mustafa Arif, Ateneo de Manila University economics professor Alvin P.
In the world of investment, economists often embrace the idea of efficient markets.
Although many economists advocate only partial solutions or even incorrect solutions because of their underlying assumptions.
The reception areas at CNBC and Bloomberg TV are crowded with mobs of economists fighting to get their forecasts on air.
The survey also showed that most economists are optimistic about the improvement of remittances from Lebanese working in Gulf states.
Dercon suggests that over the last 30 years economists have gained a much better understanding of macroeconomics and macroeconomic stability.
One is that the financial crisis and its aftermath showed a misunderstanding by the media and other noneconomists of what economists mainly do.
Economists' failure in predicting the crisis provoked jokes about their economic competence.
Canadian economists have said that the US would benefit from the oil slump in 2015.
Most economists agree on some things: tariffs are bad and free trade is good; centralized economies do not maximize economic potential; markets work, with some important exceptions.
Erik Brynjolffson and Andrew McAfee, economists. US
Such is the case with economists who adhere to the Christian faith.