Social Justice

(redirected from Economic justice)

Social Justice

Any theory or practice that encourages members of a society to behave more justly to each other. For example, a social justice policy may seek to alleviate the consequences of racism or improve relations between classes. In economics, social justice is associated with policies seeking to help the poor, especially but not necessarily at the expense of the wealthy. While generally critical of capitalism, social justice is not necessarily a socialist ideology, and is often opposed to socialism due to human rights concerns or similar grounds. See also: Justice.
References in periodicals archive ?
However the people who are joining the PTI to save Pakistan and to bring social and economic justice to the people of Pakistan are welcomed in PTI.
These women are not only dedicated to eliminating sexism in the church, but are activists in all the social and economic justice issues referred to in this report.
What the world needs now is not better nuclear weapons but better ideas about economic justice, managing cultural clashes, and responding to the deprivation of two thirds of the planet's inhabitants.
anti-apartheid movement and is currently a co-coordinator of the Priority Africa Network, a San Francisco Bay Area coalition advocating debt cancellation and economic justice for African countries.
He insist that, "today right-wing conservatives can quote King's speeches in order to criticize affirmative action while school children grow up learning only about the great pacifist not the hard-nosed critic of economic justice." In this intelligent, readable burst of controversial focus, Dyson insist on King's relevance; and in that argument Dyson succeeds.
Instead, what we need is economic justice. In a country where African American men are chronically underemployed, living-wage jobs certainly would do a lot more to cut down on crime than any number of SWAT teams.
Clinton's tepid support of most citizens' interests and his obvious debts to big money make him and his party dubious champions of economic justice. It is thus not surprising that, even as he was winning reelection, many Americans had little interest in giving his party a congressional majority.
BALTIMORE -- Calling it a matter of economic justice, the Catholic bishops of Maryland have released a pastoral statement urging Catholics to contact their state lawmakers in support of an increase in the minimum wage.
What shouldn't get left out, as it were, in remembrances of this most gracious and thoughtful man are his courageous positions on peace, nonviolence, and economic justice.
Soon after Wolfensohn's wakeup call, the campaign "grew like wildfire," says Beverly Bell, founder and director of the Center for Economic Justice, based in Washington, D.C., and Albuquerque, which serves as the boycott's convener.