Economic Slowdown

(redirected from Economic Slowdowns)

Economic Slowdown

A situation in which GDP growth slows but does not decline. For example, if GDP goes from 5% growth to 3% growth, an economy is experiencing a slowdown. Most analysts do not consider a slowdown to be a recession, but unemployment may rise and productivity may decline. See also: Depression.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 2011, almost half the countries where rising hunger occurred due to economic slowdowns or stagnation were in Africa.
The 2017 report identified three factors behind the recent rise in hunger: conflict, climate and economic slowdowns. This year's report focuses on the role of economic slowdowns and downturns in food security and nutrition.
But the trend is expected to reverse this year because China, which imports value-added materials and parts from Japan and processes them into finished products for exports to Japan and other developed countries, will be adversely affected by economic slowdowns in such export markets, according to the government-affiliated organization for promotion of Japan's external trade.
Japan's trade with China is likely to contract in 2009 for the first time in 11 years, a reversal from the previous year's growth to an all-time high, amid the global economic slowdown, the Japan External Trade Organization predicted Thursday.
Nearly all observers of the global steel industry point to overcapacity as a reality in good economic times and a tremendous burden during economic slowdowns.
The wider economic slowdown, meanwhile, has trimmed the amount of industrial scrap that flows into the yards of processors.
"Before the Great Depression, economic slowdowns and contractions were called depressions.
"Despite dire predictions of economic slowdowns, we've suddenly become more active than ever," exclaims Mr.
banks (table 1).(1) Each of the three main categories of loans--real estate, business, and consumer loans--weakened; and in a development reminiscent of other economic slowdowns, holdings of U.S.
Changes in the balance sheet of the banking industry during 1990 largely reflected the effect of the economic slowdown on loan demand and the response of banks to new capital requirements, funding difficulties, and problems in loan quality.
This deceleration likely reflects the reduction over time in the number of eligible households without home equity lines as well as the effect of the economic slowdown on the loan demand of those with these lines.
Although unchanged in November, it is expected to further increase in 2002.* The employment consequences of the economic slowdown are uncertain and depend upon the prospect of a rapid recovery, as well as on the capacity to re-establish producer and consumer confidence.