Homo Economicus

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Homo Economicus

A person that desires to maximize his/her needs or desires. Homo economicus is used most of the time to refer to the rational economic actor, who desires wealth, does not desire to work if it can be avoided, and is able to find ways achieve those ends. This assumption is accepted by many economists, especially those who follow rational choice theory, but it remains controversial. The concept of homo economicus was developed by utilitarian thinkers, and contrasts with the constructs of behavioral economics.
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Particularly relevant is Weber's explanation of the development of modern societies as a process of rationalization (in the sense of making things more and more practical and functional) deeply established the idea of the economic person as being solely goal-oriented and, only in this sense, rational.
To renew our economic picture of the world, some very interesting and progressive works have recently rejected this narrow picture of the economic person, rediscovering the Kantian person with her or his capability of living with (and for) higher needs and, therefore, of being rational in a much broader sense (e.

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