Ecoterrorist

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Ecoterrorist

A person or group that plans or commits acts of terrorism in order to protect the environment. The possibility of ecoterrorism is a type of political risk for construction companies, developers, and others.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the crimes committed by both animal rights extremists and eco-terrorists are perpetrated by independent small cells or individuals who harass and intimidate their victims.
The report describes the nightmare scenario of warrior societies and eco-terrorists forming alliances, though it admits the cooperation of all the threat groups working together in a common cause would be unlikely because of their differing social characteristics and conflicting political interests.
Flanagan stated that "the rapid expansion of natural resource industries in northern Alberta, accompanied by growing environmentalist and Aboriginal rights movements, raises issues of possible extra legal and even violent resistance to industrial development." Flanagan identified five potential sources of opposition: individual saboteurs, eco-terrorists, mainstream environmentalists, First Nations, and the Metis people; he concluded that Treaty 8 First Nations and ecoterrorists were the highest potential of trouble classifying both as "medium" risk.
THREE million-pound dream homes in a US suburb were turned into ashes in a blaze apparently started by eco-terrorists.
The question remains: "Who are the real eco-terrorists"?
Cowed by eco-terrorists and over-zealous pro-environment extremists, journalists, atypically, didn't expose politicians' cynical exploitation of voters' pro-environment sentiment.
From 1996 to 2001 a shadowy group of eco-terrorists variously calling itself the Earth Liberation Front or the Animal Liberation Front attacked targets in the western United States, destroying properties that the group claimed threatened the environment.
Everyone else seems to be preoccupied cursing "eco-terrorists" and chanting for "more fish." In this context, the Bush administrations ocean policies seem among the smaller obstacles.
Gillespie says I have apparent sympathies for eco-terrorists. To my mind, eco-terrorists are the people who burn down housing developments they don't like, or threaten violence against workers at companies that do animal testing, or send mail bombs to mid-level technoserfs and college professors.
After briefly considering the possibility that the perpetrators were eco-terrorists, investigators turned their attention to a group of six suspects, including a security guard at the construction site and a volunteer firefighter who reportedly was turned down for a job with Lennar, builder of the ruined homes.
Contrary to statements made in "Eco-terrorists take toll" (February issue), People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) does not support violence of any sort and has never committed of funded any violent acts, even while countering the phenomenal violence committed against animals in the food, leather and fur, entertainment, and experimentation industries.
There are the so-called "eco-terrorists," who have been violently opposed to the expansion of Vail Associates, the largest resort owners in Colorado, into the last pristine lynx habitat in the state; those who love the natural splendor of the area and who are resentful of the exploitation of it by tourists and wealthy pleasure-seekers; and the locals and old-time "ski-bums" who have seen their way of life destroyed.