Echo Chamber


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Echo Chamber

The tendency of members of a group to reinforce each other's views and not to contradict each other because there is little or no information presented from outside the group. An echo chamber is dangerous in business as one member may not see a flaw in another's thinking or may be afraid to point it out. However, the term is most commonly used in media to describe a self-reinforcing story. See also: Groupism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Escape the echo chamber. Retrieved from Aeon website: https://aeon.co/essays/why-its-as-hard-to-escape-an-echo-chamber-as-it-is-to-flee-a-cult
Second, echo chambers exist in other environments outside of social media.
The first line of research emphasizes that the Internet works as an "echo chamber" in which individuals are exposed to consonant views (Bimber & Davis, 2003).
Our listening skills have become dulled by the resonance of the echo chamber. We need to learn how to listen for understanding not rebuttal.
The summit will provide somewhat of a respite from the echo chamber of chatter on the obesity crisis in the United States.
So, in an odd way, I think the echo chamber nature of the Net may actually be hiding the similarities among us more than the differences.
Predictably, a cluster of strong ties resembles an echo chamber, since people with similar interests and views are apt to share similar news links.
"Other former officials have also raised concern that the current IAEA is becoming an echo chamber, focused on suspicions over Iran's programme, without the vigorous debate that characterized the era of Amano's predecessor Mohamed ElBaradei," Borger reports.
Labour chiefs believe their senior politicians don't get a fair share of air time in relation to the coalition, and that news coverage on the Beeb is often an "echo chamber" of a generally pro-Cameron press.
They seemed to me to be existing in an echo chamber. They were listening entirely to the Tweets and re-Tweets of all those who agreed with them, and seemed oddly oblivious to the fact that there was anyone (aside from the demonized enemy) who might disagree with them.
High schoolers involved online were either exposed to different viewpoints (57 percent) or none at all (34 percent), but few (5 percent) indicated they were exposed to only like-minded opinions--the so-called "echo chamber."
Luke Williams The Echo Chamber (penguin) Luke Williams couldn't be more ambitious with his debut novel.