EC

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EC

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for ECUADOR.

EC

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Republic of Ecuador. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Ecuadorian bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Ecuador. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Ecuador. Each province has its own code with the prefix "EC." For example, the code for the Province of Cotopaxi is ISO 3166-2:EC-X.

EC

see EUROPEAN UNION.

EC

(EUROPEAN COMMUNITY) see EUROPEAN UNION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hengstenberg, Commentary on Ecclesiastes (Philadelphia: Smith, English & Co.
Field" reverberates with "fall" at the end of line 1 and with "tills" and "beneath" in line 3, in a way that "earth" had not done, but it also deflects the poem from too close a connection with Ecclesiastes and its chthonic emphasis on going down to the earth.
Most Jewish, Protestant, and Catholic scholars--all of whom count Ecclesiastes in their canons--still begin every discussion of, the book by asking: "How did this ever get into the Bible?
As official empty nesters, we will, in honoring Ecclesiastes, throw away whatever son No.
Thomas calls Horace's "Hebraic didacticism" (117), a trait which might have been a point in Horace's favor for Hemingway, considering the novelist's regard for Ecclesiastes.
says the folk song, taken from the verses of Ecclesiastes, but to what?
By an apt coincidence the Old Testament lesson appointed to be read in the Church in Wales lectionary on the following day contained a verse taken from the ninth chapter of Ecclesiastes which reads, 'Wisdom is better than weapons of war: but one sinner destroyeth much good.
ORIGEN GUIDED CHRISTIAN DISCIPLES to first read Proverbs, then Ecclesiastes, and then the Song of Songs.
1] These are the words of Qoholet, the Teacher, to whom the book of Ecclesiastes in the Hebrew Bible is attributed.
But there is a time, with apologies to Jose Limon and Ecclesiastes, to pursue a column, and there is a time to retire a column.
The opening sections on religion are devastating, yet none more so than the note on which the entire work ends--a comparison of Ecclesiastes with fairies, for instance: "The Ecclesiastiques take the Cream of the Land, by Donations of ignorant men, that stand in aw of them, and by Tythes: So also it is in the Fable of Fairies, that they enter into the Dairies, and Feast upon the Cream, which they skim from the Milk.
As it says in Ecclesiastes, there is nothing new under the sun.