Eastern Caribbean Central Bank

(redirected from Eccb)
Also found in: Acronyms.

Eastern Caribbean Central Bank

The central bank of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean states, which consists of Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. It is responsible for issuing and stabilizing the East Caribbean dollar.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The AVE estimates of the ECCB, extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity were found to be adequate.
Darius (1998) Private Investment Adjustment with in the ECCB Monetary Union.
The website cited the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) as the source for its information.
The ECCB supervises offshore banks, either alone or as a shared responsibility with national regulators, in Anguilla, Dominica, Grenada, St Kitts-Nevis and St Vincent; but supervises only the domestic banking sector in Antigua and St Lucia.
Durham's fast-emerging 20-year-old was introduced to yoga during his winter in Australia as a member of the ECCB Academy squad.
(1) The Four Prague Articles dealt with free preaching of the Word of God, administering the Lord's Supper in both kinds (the chalice also for laypeople), taking away all kinds of secular authority and property from the priests, and punishing all public sins, even those of the clergy; see Jiri Otter, The First Unified Church in the Heart of Europe: The Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren (Prague: Synodal Council of the ECCB, 1992) 14.
Omer, research officer, strategic planning and projects at the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB), will speak to the topic of 'Opportunities and Threats from a Move Toward Digital Currency.'
The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) and the Financial Services Regulatory Commission (FSRC) of St Kitts and Nevis have issued a warning to residents about a Bitcoin ATM.
The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) supervises Antigua and Barbuda's domestic banking sector, along with the domestic sectors of seven other Caribbean jurisdictions.