Anomaly

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Anomaly

An unusual or unrepeatable event. For example, a stock index inexplicably rising 20% in a week during a bear market may constitute an anomaly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ebstein's anomaly is a complex congenital heart disease with an extremely low incidence of 1 per 200,000 live births.[1],[2] The pathological characteristics of each Ebstein's anomaly patient are different, which makes the surgical management complex and irregular, especially when it is treated with tricuspid valvuloplasty (TVP).
Management of patients with Ebstein's anomaly during labor focuses on maintaining normal sinus rhythm, avoiding fluid overload and providing enough relief of pain to the patient by epidural analgesia which can be upgraded to anesthesia if cesarean section is indicated (1, 12).
A 20-year-old primi, m/s 1-year/38 weeks' gestation, known case of ebstein's anomaly with severe TR referred from Govt.
Additionally, there maybe inherited abnormalities of the myocardial structure in patients with CHD such as noncompaction which is more common in Ebstein's anomaly [19]and other patients with CHD [20].
Only 1% of these patients are without other congenital anomalies (1) Commonly associated anatomic lesions include large atrial or ventricular septal defects, pulmonary stenosis, Ebstein's anomaly and single ventricle (2).
Of note, six case-control studies that measured the association between Ebstein's anomaly and lithium exposure found no link between the two.
For instance, Ebstein's anomaly is a heart defect that occurs in 1 in 20,000 births.
When the researchers analyzed data for adults separately, they saw declines in death rates from several congenital anomalies, including ventricular septal defect (60%), patent ductus arteriosus (87%), coarctation of the aorta (75%), and Ebstein's anomaly (55%).
This condition maybe isolated, or maybe associated with a variety of other abnormalities, such as congenital left or right ventricular outflow tract abnormalities (10), Barth's syndrome, Ebstein's anomaly, and bicuspid aortic valves (11).
Jay was born with a rare defect called Ebstein's Anomaly which restricts the blood flow from a baby's heart to the lungs and is often fatal.