Tiger Economy

(redirected from East Asian Tiger)

Tiger Economy

A collective name given to the economies of East and Southeast Asia, which experienced nearly unprecedented growth, especially in the 1980s and early 1990s. The Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s ended the idea that the tiger economies were unstoppable, though most have recovered well and remain important players in the global economy. See also: Keiretsu, chaebol, ASEAN.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'Nothing stops Kenya from being at the same level economically with South Korea, Malaysia, Thailand and other East Asian tiger economies except greed and selfishness by her leaders.
Unlike especially our neighboring East Asian tiger economies, we failed to make full use of our demographic dividend after the Second World War by failing to promote export-oriented, labor-intensive industries.
The rapid economic development of East Asian Tiger economies was heavily predicated on cultural norm-setting.
The East Asian tiger economy, which has the 11th largest GDP in the world, also invested heavily in science and technology, and expanded agriculture and energy sectors, becoming one of the fastest growing economies in the world through 1990s.
The rise of East Asian tiger economies has renewed attention to their being embedded in culture and society.
(5) Western journalists sometimes called the successful economies of South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore East Asian tigers or East Asian tiger economies, and the author of this work uses the term, East Asian model, and East Asian tigers interchangeably.
It brings earlier work by the authors on the East Asian Tiger economies up to the year 2005.
The US, Switzerland, Japan and China remain the big four partner countries, while NAFTA, EFTA and the East Asian tiger economies stay in place as the most important regions trading with Europe.
The Philippines missed the export-oriented boom that greatly explained the phenomenal successes of the East Asian tiger of the last century.
Then it went through the usual 'East Asian Tiger' formula for industrial development: first, the labor-intensive, export-oriented industries like garments, shoes, toys, etc.; then the capital-intensive industries such as steel, shipbuilding, chemicals and cement; and finally the high-technology industries like computers and biotech.
Much has been said of Pakistan rising up as an Asian Tiger, modelled along the lines of East Asian Tigers such as South Korea and Singapore.
For Japan, the Korean peninsula, Mongolia and China in the East Asia, for East Asian tigers and the coast-less central Asian countries, a functional port in Gwadar jointly owned by Pakistan and China will dramatically bring Pakistan as the focal point of international trade.
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