Earmark


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Earmark

1. To set aside money to use only for a certain, stated purpose. Earmarking is common in both personal savings and in corporate finance, as well as in government. For example, an individual may earmark reserves for his/her honeymoon and a company may do the same to pay off bonds when they mature. Likewise, a politician may earmark government funds for a project in his/her district. When politicians earmark funds, the word takes on a slightly negative connotation. See also: Pork barrel spending.

2. Money that has been earmarked.
References in periodicals archive ?
The federal budget has been an ongoing soap opera ever since, and even Boehner admitted that the earmark ban made his life harder.
I can anticipate what you might be thinking at this point: aren't earmarks just a way to divert funding to wasteful programs that allow politicians to reward their allies while driving up Congressional spending?
In years past, Oregon has been a significant beneficiary of earmarks.
He says that without earmarks, all projects will go through the regular budget process.
Earmark spending is not coordinated or well thought out because it's not part of the overall budget process, and that's why earmarks should be eliminated in their entirety.
presidential earmark, administration earmark, executive branch earmark,
The project, set to be unveiled this weekend, includes a four-story package produced by the AP and a congressional earmarks database that will be available to all AP members.
These include all of the earmarks to Teen Challenge, the abovementioned earmark to World Impact, an allocation of nearly half a million for the rescue mission ministry in Detroit, as well as the funding of Camp Barnabas in Missouri, the funding of Morning Star Ranch and allocations to ministries in North Dakota and Alabama.
Still, the inspector general found that some monitors "were responsible for over 100 earmark projects during FY 05, and therefore were unable to dedicate significant time to each grantee.
Although some R & D agencies, notably the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, have stayed free of earmarks, other agencies are finding that they are becoming exceedingly prevalent.